🔒
There are new articles available, click to refresh the page.
Today — 14 August 2022Security News

Tornado Cash Developer Arrested After U.S. Sanctions the Cryptocurrency Mixer

14 August 2022 at 07:11
Dutch authorities on Friday announced the arrest of a software developer in Amsterdam who is alleged to be working for Tornado Cash, days after the U.S. sanctioned the decentralized crypto mixing service. The 29-year-old individual is "suspected of involvement in concealing criminal financial flows and facilitating money laundering" through the service, the Dutch Fiscal Information and

CISA, FBI shared a joint advisory to warn of Zeppelin ransomware attacks

14 August 2022 at 06:52

The US Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) and the FBI are warning of Zeppelin ransomware attacks.

The US Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) have published a joint advisory to warn of Zeppelin ransomware attacks.

The Zeppelin ransomware first appeared on the threat landscape in November 2019 when experts from BlackBerry Cylance found a new variant of the Vega RaaS, dubbed Zeppelin.

The ransomware was involved in attacks aimed at technology and healthcare, defense contractors, educational institutions, manufacturers, companies across Europe, the United States, and Canada. At the time of its discovery, Zeppelin was distributed through watering hole attacks in which the PowerShell payloads were hosted on the Pastebin website.

Before deploying the Zeppelin ransomware, threat actors spend a couple of weeks mapping or enumerating the victim network to determine where data of interest is stored. The ransomware can be deployed as a .dll or .exe file or contained within a PowerShell loader.

Zeppelin actors request ransom payments in Bitcoin, they range from several thousand dollars to over a million dollars.

The group uses multiple attack vectors to gain access to victim networks, including RDP exploitation, SonicWall firewall vulnerabilities exploitation, and phishing attacks.

The threat actors also implement a double extortion model, threatening to leak stolen files in case the victims refuse to pay the ransom.

Zeppelin is typically deployed as a .dll or .exe file within a PowerShell loader. To each encrypted file, it appends a randomized nine-digit hexadecimal number as an extension. A ransom note is dropped on the compromised systems, usually on the desktop.

“The FBI has observed instances where Zeppelin actors executed their malware multiple times within a victim’s network, resulting in the creation of different IDs or file extensions, for each instance of an attack; this results in the victim needing several unique decryption keys.” reads the joint advisory.

The US agencies recommend not paying the ransom because there is no guarantee to recover the encrypted files and paying the ransomware will encourage the illegal practice of extortion.

The alert also included Indicators of Compromise (IOC) along with MITRE ATT&CK TECHNIQUES for this threat.

The FBI also encourages organizations to report any interactions with Zeppelin operators, including logs, Bitcoin wallet information, encrypted file samples, and decryptor files.

To mitigate the risks of ransomware attacks, organizations are recommended to define a recovery plan, implement multi-factor authentication, keep all operating systems, software, and firmware up to date, enforce a strong passwords policy, segment networks, disable unused ports and services, audit user accounts and domain controllers, implement a least-privilege access policy, review domain controllers, servers, workstations, and active directories, maintain offline backups of data, and identify, detect, and investigate abnormal activity and potential traversal of the indicated ransomware with a networking monitoring tool.

“The FBI is seeking any information that can be shared, to include boundary logs showing communication to and from foreign IP addresses, a sample ransom note, communications with Zeppelin actors, Bitcoin wallet information, decryptor files, and/or a benign sample of an encrypted file” concludes the alert.

Follow me on Twitter: @securityaffairs and Facebook

Pierluigi Paganini

(SecurityAffairs – hacking, Zeppelin ransomware)

The post CISA, FBI shared a joint advisory to warn of Zeppelin ransomware attacks appeared first on Security Affairs.

Yesterday — 13 August 2022Security News

Killnet claims to have breached Lockheed Martin

13 August 2022 at 16:51

Russian hacker group Killnet claims to have launched a DDoS attack on the aerospace and defense giant Lockheed Martin. 

The Moscow Times first reported that the Pro-Russia hacker group Killnet is claiming responsibility for a recent DDoS attack that hit the aerospace and defense giant Lockheed Martin.

The Killnet group also claims to have stolen data from a Lockheed Martin employee and threatened to share it.

killnet

The group has been active since March, it launched DDoS attacks against governments that expressed support to Ukraine, including Italy, Romania, Moldova, the Czech Republic, Lithuania, Norway, and Latvia.

In a video shared by the group on Telegram, the group claimed to have stolen the personal information of the Lockheed Martin employees, including names, email addresses, phone numbers, and pictures.

The group also shared two spreadsheets containing a message in Russian:

“If you have nothing to do, you can email Lockheed Martin Terrorists – photos and videos of the consequences of their manufactured weapons! Let them realize what they create and what they contribute to.” (Tanslated with Google).

At this time it is impossible to determine the real source of these data. Lockheed Martin is aware of the Killnet claims, but it did not comment on them.

Follow me on Twitter: @securityaffairs and Facebook

Pierluigi Paganini

(SecurityAffairs – hacking, Killnet)

The post Killnet claims to have breached Lockheed Martin appeared first on Security Affairs.

Chinese Hackers Backdoored MiMi Chat App to Target Windows, Linux, macOS Users

13 August 2022 at 12:41
A pair of reports from cybersecurity firms SEKOIA and Trend Micro sheds light on a new campaign undertaken by a Chinese threat actor named Lucky Mouse that involves leveraging a trojanized version of a cross-platform messaging app to backdoor systems. Infection chains leverage a chat application called MiMi, with its installer files compromised to download and install HyperBro samples for the

Three flaws allow attackers to bypass UEFI Secure Boot feature

13 August 2022 at 09:39

Researchers discovered a flaw in three signed third-party UEFI boot loaders that allow bypass of the UEFI Secure Boot feature.

Researchers from hardware security firm Eclypsium have discovered a vulnerability in three signed third-party Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) boot loaders that can be exploited to bypass the UEFI Secure Boot feature.

Secure Boot is a security feature of the latest Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) 2.3.1 designed to detect tampering with boot loaders, key operating system files, and unauthorized option ROMs by validating their digital signatures. “Detections are blocked from running before they can attack or infect the system specification.”

UEFI Secure Boot

According to the experts, these three new bootloader vulnerabilities affect most of the devices released over the past 10 years, including x86-64 and ARM-based devices.

“These vulnerabilities could be used by an attacker to easily evade Secure Boot protections and compromise the integrity of the boot process;  enabling the attacker to modify the operating system as it loads, install backdoors, and disable operating system security controls.” reads the post published by the experts. “Much like our previous GRUB2 BootHole research, these new vulnerable bootloaders are signed by the Microsoft UEFI Third Party Certificate Authority. By default, this CA is trusted by virtually all traditional Windows and Linux-based systems such as laptops, desktops, servers, tablets, and all-in-one systems.”

Experts pointed out that these bootloaders are signed by the Microsoft UEFI Third Party Certificate Authority, the good news is that the IT giant has already addressed this flaw with the release of Patch Tuesday security updates for August 2020.

The flaws identified by the experts have been rated as:

  • CVE-2022-34301 – Eurosoft (UK) Ltd
  • CVE-2022-34302 – New Horizon Datasys Inc
  • CVE-2022-34303 – CryptoPro Secure Disk for BitLocker

The two CVE-2022-34301 and CVE-2022-34303 are similar in the way they involve signed UEFI shells, the first one the signed shell is esdiags.efi while for the third one (CryptoPro Secure Disk), the shell is Shell_Full.efi.

Threat actors can abuse built-in capabilities such as the ability to read and write to memory, list handles, and map memory, to allow the shell to evade Secure Boot. The experts warn that the exploitation could be easily automated using startup scripts, for this reason, it is likely that threat actors will attempt to exploit it in the wild.

“Exploiting these vulnerabilities requires an attacker to have elevated privileges (Administrator on Windows or root on Linux). However,  local privilege escalation is a common problem on both platforms. In particular, Microsoft does not consider UAC-bypass a defendable security boundary and often does not fix reported bypasses, so there are many mechanisms in Windows that can be used to elevate privileges from a non-privileged user to Administrator.” continues the post.

The exploitation of the New Horizon Datasys vulnerability (CVE-2022-34302) is more stealthy, system owners cannot detect the exploitation. The bootloader contains a built-in bypass for Secure Boot that can be exploited to disable the Secure Boot checks while maintaining the Secure Boot on.

“This bypass can further enable even more complex evasions such as disabling security handlers. In this case, an attacker would not need scripting commands, and could directly run arbitrary unsigned code. The simplicity of exploitation makes it highly likely that adversaries will attempt to exploit this particular vulnerability in the wild.” continues the post.

Experts highlighters that the exploitation of these vulnerabilities requires an attacker to have administrator privileges, which can be achieved in different ways.

“Much like BootHole, these vulnerabilities highlight the challenges of ensuring the boot integrity of devices that rely on a complex supply chain of vendors and code working together,” the post concludes. “these issues highlight how simple vulnerabilities in third-party code can undermine the entire process.”

Follow me on Twitter: @securityaffairs and Facebook

Pierluigi Paganini

(SecurityAffairs – hacking, UEFI Secure Boot)

The post Three flaws allow attackers to bypass UEFI Secure Boot feature appeared first on Security Affairs.

Before yesterdaySecurity News

Researchers Uncover UEFI Secure Boot Bypass in 3 Microsoft Signed Boot Loaders

12 August 2022 at 20:02
A security feature bypass vulnerability has been uncovered in three signed third-party Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) boot loaders that allow bypass of the UEFI Secure Boot feature. "These vulnerabilities can be exploited by mounting the EFI System Partition and replacing the existing bootloader with the vulnerable one, or modifying a UEFI variable to load the vulnerable loader

The US offers a $10M rewards for info on the Conti ransomware gang’s members

12 August 2022 at 17:58

The U.S. State Department announced a $10 million reward for information related to five individuals associated with the Conti ransomware gang.

The U.S. State Department announced a $10 million reward for information on five prominent members of the Conti ransomware gang. The government will also reward people that will provide details about Conti and its affiliated groups TrickBot and Wizard Spider.

The reward is covered by the Rewards of Justice program operated by the a U.S. Department of State which offers rewards for information related to threats to homeland security.

According to Wired, which first reported the announcement, the State Department is looking for the members’ physical locations and vacation and travel plans.

This is the first time that the U.S. Government shows the face of a Conti associate, referred to as “Target.”

“Today marks the first time that the US government has publicly identified a Conti operative,” says a State Department official who asked not to be named and did not provide any more information about Target’s identity beyond the picture. “That photo is the first time the US government has ever identified a malicious actor associated with Conti,” 

The other members of the Conti gang for which the US Government is offering a reward are referred to as “Tramp,” “Dandis,” “Professor,” and “Reshaev.”

The U.S. Government reveals the face of a Conti associate for the first time! We’re trying to put a name with the face!

To the guy in the photo: Imagine how many cool hats you could buy with $10 million dollars!

Write to us via our Tor-based tip line: https://t.co/WvkI416g4W pic.twitter.com/28BgYXYRy2

— Rewards for Justice (@RFJ_USA) August 11, 2022

In February, a Ukrainian researcher leaked 60,694 messages internal chat messages belonging to the Conti ransomware operation after the announcement of the group of its support to Russia..

The leaked files revealed that some high-level members of the gang have connections to Russian intelligence.

The Rewards of Justice program also offer rewards for information on other threat actors, including the REvil ransomware gang, Darkside gang, the Evil Corp, and the North Korea-liked APT groups.

Follow me on Twitter: @securityaffairs and Facebook

Pierluigi Paganini

(SecurityAffairs – hacking, Conti ransomware)

The post The US offers a $10M rewards for info on the Conti ransomware gang’s members appeared first on Security Affairs.

Sounding the Alarm on Emergency Alert System Flaws

12 August 2022 at 15:26

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is urging states and localities to beef up security around proprietary devices that connect to the Emergency Alert System — a national public warning system used to deliver important emergency information, such as severe weather and AMBER alerts. The DHS warning came in advance of a workshop to be held this weekend at the DEFCON security conference in Las Vegas, where a security researcher is slated to demonstrate multiple weaknesses in the nationwide alert system.

A Digital Alert Systems EAS encoder/decoder that Pyle said he acquired off eBay in 2019. It had the username and password for the system printed on the machine.

The DHS warning was prompted by security researcher Ken Pyle, a partner at security firm Cybir. Pyle said he started acquiring old EAS equipment off of eBay in 2019, and that he quickly identified a number of serious security vulnerabilities in a device that is broadly used by states and localities to encode and decode EAS alert signals.

“I found all kinds of problems back then, and reported it to the DHS, FBI and the manufacturer,” Pyle said in an interview with KrebsOnSecurity. “But nothing ever happened. I decided I wasn’t going to tell anyone about it yet because I wanted to give people time to fix it.”

Pyle said he took up the research again in earnest after an angry mob stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.

“I was sitting there thinking, ‘Holy shit, someone could start a civil war with this thing,”’ Pyle recalled. “I went back to see if this was still a problem, and it turns out it’s still a very big problem. So I decided that unless someone actually makes this public and talks about it, clearly nothing is going to be done about it.”

The EAS encoder/decoder devices Pyle acquired were made by Lyndonville, NY-based Digital Alert Systems (formerly Monroe Electronics, Inc.), which issued a security advisory this month saying it released patches in 2019 to fix the flaws reported by Pyle, but that some customers are still running outdated versions of the device’s firmware. That may be because the patches were included in version 4 of the firmware for the EAS devices, and many older models apparently do not support the new software.

“The vulnerabilities identified present a potentially serious risk, and we believe both were addressed in software updates issued beginning Oct 2019,” EAS said in a written statement. “We also provided attribution for the researcher’s responsible disclosure, allowing us to rectify the matters before making any public statements. We are aware that some users have not taken corrective actions and updated their software and should immediately take action to update the latest software version to ensure they are not at risk. Anything lower than version 4.1 should be updated immediately. On July 20, 2022, the researcher referred to other potential issues, and we trust the researcher will provide more detail. We will evaluate and work to issue any necessary mitigations as quickly as possible.”

But Pyle said a great many EAS stakeholders are still ignoring basic advice from the manufacturer, such as changing default passwords and placing the devices behind a firewall, not directly exposing them to the Internet, and restricting access only to trusted hosts and networks.

Pyle, in a selfie that is heavily redacted because the EAS device behind him had its user credentials printed on the lid.

Pyle said the biggest threat to the security of the EAS is that an attacker would only need to compromise a single EAS station to send out alerts locally that can be picked up by other EAS systems and retransmitted across the nation.

“The process for alerts is automated in most cases, hence, obtaining access to a device will allow you to pivot around,” he said. “There’s no centralized control of the EAS because these devices are designed such that someone locally can issue an alert, but there’s no central control over whether I am the one person who can send or whatever. If you are a local operator, you can send out nationwide alerts. That’s how easy it is to do this.”

One of the Digital Alert Systems devices Pyle sourced from an electronics recycler earlier this year was non-functioning, but whoever discarded it neglected to wipe the hard drive embedded in the machine. Pyle soon discovered the device contained the private cryptographic keys and other credentials needed to send alerts through Comcast, the nation’s third-largest cable company.

“I can issue and create my own alert here, which has all the valid checks or whatever for being a real alert station,” Pyle said in an interview earlier this month. “I can create a message that will start propagating through the EAS.”

Comcast told KrebsOnSecurity that “a third-party device used to deliver EAS alerts was lost in transit by a trusted shipping provider between two Comcast locations and subsequently obtained by a cybersecurity researcher.

“We’ve conducted a thorough investigation of this matter and have determined that no customer data, and no sensitive Comcast data, were compromised,” Comcast spokesperson David McGuire said.

The company said it also confirmed that the information included on the device can no longer be used to send false messages to Comcast customers or used to compromise devices within Comcast’s network, including EAS devices.

“We are taking steps to further ensure secure transfer of such devices going forward,” McGuire said. “Separately, we have conducted a thorough audit of all EAS devices on our network and confirmed that they are updated with currently available patches and are therefore not vulnerable to recently reported security issues. We’re grateful for the responsible disclosure and to the security research community for continuing to engage and share information with our teams to make our products and technologies ever more secure. Mr. Pyle informed us promptly of his research and worked with us as we took steps to validate his findings and ensure the security of our systems.”

The user interface for an EAS device.

Unauthorized EAS broadcast alerts have happened enough that there is a chronicle of EAS compromises over at fandom.com. Thankfully, most of these incidents have involved fairly obvious hoaxes.

According to the EAS wiki, in February 2013, hackers broke into the EAS networks in Great Falls, Mt. and Marquette, Mich. to broadcast an alert that zombies had risen from their graves in several counties. In Feb. 2017, an EAS station in Indiana also was hacked, with the intruders playing the same “zombies and dead bodies” audio from the 2013 incidents.

“On February 20 and February 21, 2020, Wave Broadband’s EASyCAP equipment was hacked due to the equipment’s default password not being changed,” the Wiki states. “Four alerts were broadcasted, two of which consisted of a Radiological Hazard Warning and a Required Monthly Test playing parts of the Hip Hop song Hot by artist Young Thug.”

In January 2018, Hawaii sent out an alert to cell phones, televisions and radios, warning everyone in the state that a missile was headed their way. It took 38 minutes for Hawaii to let people know the alert was a misfire, and that a draft alert was inadvertently sent. The news video clip below about the 2018 event in Hawaii does a good job of walking through how the EAS works.

Xiaomi Phones with MediaTek Chips Found Vulnerable to Forged Payments

12 August 2022 at 12:20
Security flaws have been identified in Xiaomi Redmi Note 9T and Redmi Note 11 models, which could be exploited to disable the mobile payment mechanism and even forge transactions via a rogue Android app installed on the devices. Check Point said it found the flaws in devices powered by MediaTek chipsets during a security analysis of the Chinese handset maker's "Kinibi" Trusted Execution

U.S. Government Offers $10 Million Reward for Information on Conti Ransomware Gang

12 August 2022 at 10:30
The U.S. State Department on Thursday announced a $10 million reward for information related to five individuals associated with the Conti ransomware group. The reward offer is also notable for the fact that it marks the first time the face of a Conti associate, known as "Target," has been unmasked. The four other alleged members have been referred to as "Tramp," "Dandis," "Professor," and "

Facebook Testing Default End-to-End Encryption and Encrypted Backups in Messenger

12 August 2022 at 09:09
Social media company Meta said it will begin testing end-to-end encryption (E2EE) on its Messenger platform this week for select users as the default option, as the company continues to slowly add security layers to its various chat services. "If you're in the test group, some of your most frequent chats may be automatically end-to-end encrypted, which means you won't have to opt in to the

Cisco Patches High-Severity Vulnerability Affecting ASA and Firepower Solutions

12 August 2022 at 08:14
Cisco on Wednesday released patches to contain multiple flaws in its software that could be abused to leak sensitive information on susceptible appliances. The issue, assigned the identifier CVE-2022-20866 (CVSS score: 7.4), has been described as a "logic error" when handling RSA keys on devices running Cisco Adaptive Security Appliance (ASA) Software and Cisco Firepower Threat Defense (FTD)

Fast and Secure VPN on a Budget? Private Internet Access VPN Has You Covered

12 August 2022 at 08:10
Back when the internet consisted of a handful of computers networked together across a few research institutions, nobody could have imagined that it would one day form the backbone of a new digital way of life. And that probably explains why none of the researchers who thought up its core technologies — things like packet switching and TCP/IP — gave much consideration to the need to secure the

Experts warn of mass exploitation of an RCE flaw in Zimbra Collaboration Suite

12 August 2022 at 08:00

Threat actors are exploiting an authentication bypass Zimbra flaw, tracked as CVE-2022-27925, to hack Zimbra Collaboration Suite email servers worldwide.

An authentication bypass affecting Zimbra Collaboration Suite, tracked as CVE-2022-27925, is actively exploited to hack ZCS email servers worldwide.

Zimbra is an email and collaboration platform used by more than 200,000 businesses from over 140 countries.

Yesterday, August 11, CISA has added two new vulnerabilities to its Known Exploited Vulnerabilities Catalog, based on evidence of active exploitation. The two issues are:

  • CVE-2022-27925 (CVSS score: 7.2) – Zimbra Collaboration (ZCS) Arbitrary File Upload Vulnerability: Zimbra Collaboration (ZCS) contains flaw in the mboximport functionality, allowing an authenticated attacker to upload arbitrary files to perform remote code execution. This vulnerability was chained with CVE-2022-37042 which allows for unauthenticated remote code execution.
  • CVE-2022-37042 – Zimbra Collaboration (ZCS) Authentication Bypass Vulnerability: Zimbra Collaboration (ZCS) contains an authentication bypass vulnerability in MailboxImportServlet. This vulnerability was chained with CVE-2022-27925 which allows for unauthenticated remote code execution.

CISA orders federal agencies to fix both issues by August 25, 2022.

The vendor has already released security updates to address both vulnerabilities.

Cybersecurity firm Volexity described confirmed that the flaw is actively exploited in attacks in the wild.

In July and early August 2022, the company worked on multiple incidents where the organizations had their Zimbra Collaboration Suite (ZCS) email servers compromised. Volexity discovered that threat actors have exploited the CVE-2022-27925 remote-code-execution (RCE) vulnerability in these attacks.

The flaw was patched in March 2022, since the release of security fixes, it was reasonable that threat actors performed reverse engineering of them and developed an exploit code.

“As each investigation progressed, Volexity found signs of remote exploitation but no evidence the attackers had the prerequisite authenticated administrative sessions needed to exploit it. Further, in most cases, Volexity believed it extremely unlikely the remote attackers would have been able to obtain administrative credentials on the victims’ ZCS email servers.” reads the advisory published by Volexity.

“As a result of the above findings, Volexity initiated more research into determining a means to exploit CVE-2022-27925, and if it was possible to do so without an authenticated administrative session. Subsequent testing by Volexity determined it was possible to bypass authentication when accessing the same endpoint (mboximport) used by CVE-2022-27925. This meant that CVE-2022-27925 could be exploited without valid administrative credentials, thus making the vulnerability significantly more critical in severity.” reads the post published by Volexity.

Volexity researchers scanned the Internet for compromised Zimbra instances belonging to non-Volexity customers. The security firm identified over 1,000 ZCS instances around the world that were backdoored and compromised. The compromised ZCS installs belongs to a variety of global organizations, including government departments and ministries, military branches, worldwide billionaire businesses, and a significant number of small businesses.

Zimbra

The countries with the most compromised instances include the U.S., Italy, Germany, France, India, Russia, Indonesia, Switzerland, Spain, and Poland.

“CVE-2022-27925 was originally listed as an RCE exploit requiring authentication. When combined with a separate bug, however, it became an unauthenticated RCE exploit that made remote exploitation trivial. Some organizations may prioritize patching based on the severity of security issues. In this case, the vulnerability was listed as medium—not high or critical—which may have led some organizations to postpone patching.” concludes the post.

A few days ago, CISA added a recently disclosed flaw in the Zimbra email suite, tracked as CVE-2022-27924, to its Known Exploited Vulnerabilities Catalog.

In middle June, researchers from Sonarsource discovered the high-severity vulnerability impacting the Zimbra email suite, tracked as CVE-2022-27924 (CVSS score: 7.5). It can be exploited by an unauthenticated attacker to steal login credentials of users without user interaction.

Follow me on Twitter: @securityaffairs and Facebook

Pierluigi Paganini

(SecurityAffairs – hacking, RCE)

The post Experts warn of mass exploitation of an RCE flaw in Zimbra Collaboration Suite appeared first on Security Affairs.

BazarCall attacks have revolutionized ransomware operations

12 August 2022 at 06:25

The Conti ransomware gang is using BazarCall phishing attacks as an initial attack vector to access targeted networks.

BazarCall attack, aka call back phishing, is an attack vector that utilizes targeted phishing methodology and was first used by the Ryuk ransomware gang in 2020/2021.

The BazarCall attack chain is composed of the following stages:

  • Stage One. Attackers send a mail to the victims that notify them that they have subscribed to a service for which payment is automatic. The email includes a phone number to call to cancel the subscription.
  • Stage Two. The victim is tricked into contacting a special call center. When operators receive a call, they use a variety of social engineering tactics, to convince victims to give remote desktop control, to help them cancel their subscription service.
  • Stage Three. Once accessed the victim’s desktop, the attacker silently extended a foothold in the user’s network, weaponizing legitimate tools that are known to be in Conti’s arsenal. The initial operator remains on the line with the victim, pretending to assist them with the remote desktop access by continuing to utilize social engineering tactics.
  • Stage Four. The initiated malware session yields the adversary access as an initial point of entry into the victim’s network.
bazarcall conti

The researchers at cybersecurity firm AdbIntel state that currently at least three autonomous threat groups are adopting and independently developing their own targeted phishing tactics derived from the call back phishing methodology. The three groups are tracked as Silent Ransom, Quantum, and Roy/Zeon, they emerged after the Conti gang opted to shut down its operation in May 2022.

In March 2022, formed members of the Conti, who were experts in call back phishing attacks, created “Silent Ransom” when it became an autonomous group.

Silent Ransom’s previous bosses, tracked as Conti Team Two, who were the main Conti subdivision, rebranded as Quantum and launched their own version of call back phishing campaigns. On June 13, 2022, AdvIntel researchers uncovered a massive operation called “Jörmungandr”.

The third iteration of the BazarCall group was observed in late June 20 and goes by the name of Roy/Zeon. The group is composed of old-Guard members of Conti’s “Team One,” which created the Ryuk operation. This group has the advanced social engineering capabilities of the three groups.

It involved large investments into hiring spammers, OSINT specialists, designers, call center operators, and expanding the number of network intruders. As a highly skilled (and most likely government-affiliated) group, Quantum was able to purchase exclusive email datasets and manually parse them to identify relevant employees at high-profile companies.

bazarcall

The adoption of Callback phishing campaigns has impacted the strategy of ransomware gangs, experts observed targeted attacks aimed at Finance, Technology, Legal, and Insurance industries. The industries are considered privileged targets in almost all internal manuals, which were shared between ex-Conti members.

“Since its resurgence in March earlier this year, call back phishing has entirely revolutionized the current threat landscape and forced its threat actors to reevaluate and update their methodologies of attack in order to stay on top of the new ransomware food chain.” concludes the report published by Advintel. “Although the first to begin using this TTP as its primary initial attack vector, Silent Ransom is no longer the only threat group utilizing the highly specified phishing operations that they pioneered. Other threat groups, seeing the success, efficiency, and targeting capabilities of the tactic have begun using reversed phishing campaign as a base and developing the attack vector into their own.”

Follow me on Twitter: @securityaffairs and Facebook

Pierluigi Paganini

(SecurityAffairs – hacking, Conti)

The post BazarCall attacks have revolutionized ransomware operations appeared first on Security Affairs.

Researchers Warn of Ongoing Mass Exploitation of Zimbra RCE Vulnerability

12 August 2022 at 06:14
The U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) on Thursday added two flaws to its Known Exploited Vulnerabilities Catalog, citing evidence of active exploitation. The two high-severity issues relate to weaknesses in Zimbra Collaboration, both of which could be chained to achieve unauthenticated remote code execution on affected email servers - CVE-2022-27925 (CVSS score: 7.2)

Palo Alto Networks warns of Reflected Amplification DoS issue in PAN-OS

11 August 2022 at 17:58

Palo Alto Networks devices running the PAN-OS are abused to launch reflected amplification denial-of-service (DoS) attacks.

Threat actors are exploiting a vulnerability, tracked as CVE-2022-0028 (CVSS score of 8.6), in Palo Alto Networks devices running the PAN-OS to launch reflected amplification denial-of-service (DoS) attacks.

The vendor has learned that firewalls from multiple vendors are abused to conduct distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, but it did not disclose the name of the impacted companies.

“Palo Alto Networks recently learned that an attempted reflected denial-of-service (RDoS) attack was identified by a service provider. This attempted attack took advantage of susceptible firewalls from multiple vendors, including Palo Alto Networks. We immediately started to root cause and remediate this issue.” reads the advisory published by Palo Alto Networks. “Exploitation of this issue does not impact the confidentiality, integrity, or availability of our products.

The root cause of the issue affecting the Palo Alto Network devices is a misconfiguration in the PAN-OS URL filtering policy that allows a network-based attacker to conduct reflected and amplified TCP DoS attacks. The DoS attack would appear to originate from a Palo Alto Networks PA-Series (hardware), VM-Series (virtual) and CN-Series (container) firewall against a target chosen by the attackers.

Palo Alto Networks GlobalProtect VPN

The issue could be exploited if the firewall configuration has a URL filtering profile with one or more blocked categories assigned to a security rule with a source zone that has an external facing network interface.

The flaw can be mitigated by removing the URL filtering policy, the company also recommends enabling only one security feature between packet-based attack protection and flood protection on their Palo Alto.

If exploited, this flaw would not impact the confidentiality, integrity, or availability of Palo Alto Networks products. However, the company pointed out that the resulting denial-of-service (DoS) attack may allow threat actors to hide their identity and implicate the firewall as the source of the attack.

Below is the Product Status shared by the vendor:

Versions Affected Unaffected
Cloud NGFW None All
PAN-OS 10.2 < 10.2.2-h2 >= 10.2.2-h2 (ETA: week of August 15, 2022)
PAN-OS 10.1 < 10.1.6-h6 >= 10.1.6-h6
PAN-OS 10.0 < 10.0.11-h1 >= 10.0.11-h1 (ETA: week of August 15, 2022)
PAN-OS 9.1 < 9.1.14-h4 >= 9.1.14-h4 (ETA: week of August 15, 2022)
PAN-OS 9.0 < 9.0.16-h3 >= 9.0.16-h3 (ETA: week of August 15, 2022)
PAN-OS 8.1 < 8.1.23-h1 >= 8.1.23-h1 (ETA: August 15, 2022)
Prisma Access 3.1 None All
Prisma Access 3.0 None All
Prisma Access 2.2 None All
Prisma Access 2.1 None All

The US Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) also published a security advisory to warn of this vulnerability.

“Palo Alto Networks has released a security update to address a vulnerability in PAN-OS firewall configurations. A remote attacker could exploit this vulnerability to conduct a reflected denial-of service,” reads the advisory published by CISA.

Follow me on Twitter: @securityaffairs and Facebook

Pierluigi Paganini

(SecurityAffairs – hacking, CVE-2022-0028)

The post Palo Alto Networks warns of Reflected Amplification DoS issue in PAN-OS appeared first on Security Affairs.

Conti Cybercrime Cartel Using 'BazarCall' Phishing Attacks as Initial Attack Vector

11 August 2022 at 17:52
A trio of offshoots from the notorious Conti cybercrime cartel have resorted to the technique of call-back phishing as an initial access vector to breach targeted networks. "Three autonomous threat groups have since adopted and independently developed their own targeted phishing tactics derived from the call back phishing methodology," cybersecurity firm AdvIntel said in a Wednesday report.

It Might Be Our Data, But It’s Not Our Breach

11 August 2022 at 17:45

Image: Shutterstock.

A cybersecurity firm says it has intercepted a large, unique stolen data set containing the names, addresses, email addresses, phone numbers, Social Security Numbers and dates of birth on nearly 23 million Americans. The firm’s analysis of the data suggests it corresponds to current and former customers of AT&T. The telecommunications giant stopped short of saying the data wasn’t theirs, but it maintains the records do not appear to have come from its systems and may be tied to a previous data incident at another company.

Milwaukee-based cybersecurity consultancy Hold Security said it intercepted a 1.6 gigabyte compressed file on a popular dark web file-sharing site. The largest item in the archive is a 3.6 gigabyte file called “dbfull,” and it contains 28.5 million records, including 22.8 million unique email addresses and 23 million unique SSNs. There are no passwords in the database.

Hold Security founder Alex Holden said a number of patterns in the data suggest it relates to AT&T customers. For starters, email addresses ending in “att.net” accounted for 13.7 percent of all addresses in the database, with addresses from SBCGLobal.net and Bellsouth.net — both AT&T companies — making up another seven percent. In contrast, Gmail users made up more than 30 percent of the data set, with Yahoo addresses accounting for 24 percent. More than 10,000 entries in the database list “[email protected]” in the email field.

Hold Security found these email domains account for 87% of all domains in the data set. Nearly 21% belonged to AT&T customers.

Holden’s team also examined the number of email records that included an alias in the username portion of the email, and found 293 email addresses with plus addressing. Of those, 232 included an alias that indicated the customer had signed up at some AT&T property; 190 of the aliased email addresses were “[email protected]”; 42 were “[email protected],” an oddly specific reference to an AT&T entity that included broadband Internet. In September 2016, AT&T rebranded U-verse as AT&T Internet.

According to its website, AT&T Internet is offered in 21 states, including Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas and Wisconsin. Nearly all of the records in the database that contain a state designation corresponded to those 21 states; all other states made up just 1.64 percent of the records, Hold Security found.

Image: Hold Security.

The vast majority of records in this database belong to consumers, but almost 13,000 of the entries are for corporate entities. Holden said 387 of those corporate names started with “ATT,” with various entries like “ATT PVT XLOW” appearing 81 times. And most of the addresses for these entities are AT&T corporate offices.

How old is this data? One clue may be in the dates of birth exposed in this database. There are very few records in this file with dates of birth after 2000.

“Based on these statistics, we see that the last significant number of subscribers born in March of 2000,” Holden told KrebsOnSecurity, noting that AT&T requires new account holders to be 18 years of age or older. “Therefore, it makes sense that the dataset was likely created close to March of 2018.”

There was also this anomaly: Holden said one of his analysts is an AT&T customer with a 13-letter last name, and that her AT&T bill has always had the same unique misspelling of her surname (they added yet another letter). He said the analyst’s name is identically misspelled in this database.

KrebsOnSecurity shared the large data set with AT&T, as well as Hold Security’s analysis of it. AT&T ultimately declined to say whether all of the people in the database are or were at some point AT&T customers. The company said the data appears to be several years old, and that “it’s not immediately possible to determine the percentage that may be customers.”

“This information does not appear to have come from our systems,” AT&T said in a written statement. “It may be tied to a previous data incident at another company. It is unfortunate that data can continue to surface over several years on the dark web. However, customers often receive notices after such incidents, and advice for ID theft is consistent and can be found online.”

The company declined to elaborate on what they meant by “a previous data incident at another company.”

But it seems likely that this database is related to one that went up for sale on a hacker forum on August 19, 2021. That auction ran with the title “AT&T Database +70M (SSN/DOB),” and was offered by ShinyHunters, a well-known threat actor with a long history of compromising websites and developer repositories to steal credentials or API keys.

Image: BleepingComputer

ShinyHunters established the starting price for the auction at $200,000, but set the “flash” or “buy it now” price at $1 million. The auction also included a small sampling of the stolen information, but that sample is no longer available. The hacker forum where the ShinyHunters sales thread existed was seized by the FBI in April, and its alleged administrator arrested.

But cached copies of the auction, as recorded by cyber intelligence firm Intel 471, show ShinyHunters received bids of up to $230,000 for the entire database before they suspended the sale.

“This thread has been deleted several times,” ShinyHunters wrote in their auction discussion on Sept. 6, 2021. “Therefore, the auction is suspended. AT&T will be available on WHM as soon as they accept new vendors.”

The WHM initialism was a reference to the White House Market, a dark web marketplace that shut down in October 2021.

“In many cases, when a database is not sold, ShinyHunters will release it for free on hacker forums,” wrote BleepingComputer’s Lawrence Abrams, who broke the news of the auction last year and confronted AT&T about the hackers’ claims.

AT&T gave Abrams a similar statement, saying the data didn’t come from their systems.

“When asked whether the data may have come from a third-party partner, AT&T chose not to speculate,” Abrams wrote. “‘Given this information did not come from us, we can’t speculate on where it came from or whether it is valid,'” AT&T told BleepingComputer.

Asked to respond to AT&T’s denial, ShinyHunters told BleepingComputer at the time, “I don’t care if they don’t admit. I’m just selling.”

On June 1, 2022, a 21-year-old Frenchman was arrested in Morocco for allegedly being a member of ShinyHunters. Databreaches.net reports the defendant was arrested on an Interpol “Red Notice” at the request of a U.S. federal prosecutor from Washington state.

Databreaches.net suggests the warrant could be tied to a ShinyHunters theft in May 2020, when the group announced they had exfiltrated 500 GB of Microsoft’s source code from Microsoft’s private GitHub repositories.

“Researchers assess that Shiny Hunters gained access to roughly 1,200 private repositories around March 28, 2020, which have since been secured,” reads a May 2020 alert posted by the New Jersey Cybersecurity & Communications Integration Cell, a component within the New Jersey Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness.

“Though the breach was largely dismissed as insignificant, some images of the directory listing appear to contain source code for Azure, Office, and some Windows runtimes, and concerns have been raised regarding access to private API keys or passwords that may have been mistakenly included in some private repositories,” the alert continues. “Additionally, Shiny Hunters is flooding dark web marketplaces with breached databases.”

Last month, T-Mobile agreed to pay $350 million to settle a consolidated class action lawsuit over a breach in 2021 that affected 40 million current and former customers. The breach came to light on Aug. 16, 2021, when someone starting selling tens of millions of SSN/DOB records from T-Mobile on the same hacker forum where the ShinyHunters would post their auction for the claimed AT&T database just three days later.

T-Mobile has not disclosed many details about the “how” of last year’s breach, but it said the intruder(s) “leveraged their knowledge of technical systems, along with specialized tools and capabilities, to gain access to our testing environments and then used brute force attacks and other methods to make their way into other IT servers that included customer data.”

A sales thread tied to the stolen T-Mobile customer data.

❌