🔒
There are new articles available, click to refresh the page.
Yesterday — 1 December 2021Reverse Engineering

Toss a Coin to your Helper (Part 2 of 2)

1 December 2021 at 14:26

In the first posting of this series, we looked at a clipboard stealer belonging to the MyKings botnet. In this second part of the blog series, we will discuss in detail a very prevalent malware family of AutoIt droppers, that we call CoinHelper, used in a massive coinmining campaign. Since the beginning of 2021, Avast has protected more than 125,000 users worldwide from this threat. CoinHelper is mostly bundled with cracked software installers such as WinRAR and game cheats.

Regarding game cheats, we’ve seen this bundling with some of the most popular and famous games out there including (but not limited to): Extrim and Anxious (Counter-Strike Global Offensive cheats), Cyberpunk 2077 Trainer (Cyberpunk 2077 cheat), PUBG and CoD cheats, and Minecraft. We’ve also found this threat inside a Windows 11 ISO image from unofficial sources (as we indicated on Twitter). We have even seen this threat bundled with clean software such as Logitech drivers for webcams. All in all, we have seen CoinHelper bundled with more than 2,700 different software so far, including games, game cheats, security software, utilities, clean and malware applications alike.

Our research brought us to this because we have seen a spread of these droppers via MyKings’ clipboard stealer payload as well, as described in our previous part of the blog post series. Nevertheless we can’t attribute CoinHelper to MyKings botnet, on the contrary based on the number of different sources of infection, we believe that CoinHelper used MyKings’ clipboard stealer as an additional system of malware delivery.


We have found some mentions of these AutoIt droppers in other blog posts from last year. One of the most notable instances was detailed by Trend Micro, describing a sample of the AutoIt dropper bundled with Zoom communicator (downloaded from an unofficial source) which happened in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic when millions of new users were flocking to Zoom. Another instance is in a post from Cybereason mentioning a new dropper for XMRig miners.

In this blog post, we analyze the latest version of CoinHelper in detail, discuss the malware campaign, describe all its components as well as research into what applications are most often bundled with the malware and show how the malware spreads. We also outline some of the data harvesting that it performs on infected systems to map the infected victims.

Campaign overview

Since the beginning of 2020, we have seen more than 220,000 attempts to infect our users with CoinHelper, most of them being in Russia (83,000). The second most targeted country is Ukraine with more than 42,000 attacked users.

Map illustrating the targeted countries since the beginning of 2020

Monetary gain

One of the primary goals of CoinHelper is to drop a crypto miner on the infected machine and use the resources (electricity and computing power) of the victim’s computer to generate money for the attackers through mining.

Even though we observed that multiple crypto currencies, including Ethereum or Bitcoin, were mined, there was one particular that stood out – Monero. From the total of 377 crypto wallet addresses we extracted from the malware, 311 of them mined Monero through crypto mining pools. The reasons for criminals to choose Monero are quite obvious. Firstly, this cryptocurrency was created and designed to be private and anonymous. This means that tracing the transactions, owners of the accounts or even amounts of money that were stolen and/or mined can be quite difficult. Secondly, this cryptocurrency has a good value at this time – you can exchange 1 XMR  for ~$240 USD (as of 2021-11-29) 

Even though Monero is designed to be anonymous, thanks to the wrong usage of addresses and the mechanics of how mining pools work, we were able to look more into the Monero mining operation of the malware authors and find out more about how much money they were able to gain.

To ensure more regular income, the miners were configured to use Monero mining pools. Mining pools are often used by miners to create one big and powerful node of computing power that works together to find a suitable hash and collect a reward for it. Because the search for the suitable hash is random, the more guesses you make, the bigger your chance to be successful. In the end, when the pool receives a reward, the money is split between the members of the pool depending on their share of work. Usage of the pools is very convenient for malware authors, specifically because pools work with a limited time. This is helpful for malware authors because it gives them a greater chance to successfully mine cryptocurrency in the limited time they have before their miners are discovered and eradicated.

In total we registered 311 Monero addresses used in the configuration of miners dropped by the AutoIts. These addresses were used in more than 15 different Monero mining pools whereas our data and research confirm that the mining campaign is even bigger and a lot of the addresses were used across multiple pools. After diving more into the data that the pools offer, we are able to confirm that as of 2021-11-29 the authors gained more than 1,216 XMR solely by crypto mining, which translates into over $290,000 USD. 

Apart from the Monero addresses, we also registered 54 Bitcoin addresses and 5 Ethereum addresses. After looking at these addresses we can conclude that these addresses received following amounts of money:

Cryptocurrency Earnings in USD Earnings in cryptocurrency Number of wallets
Monero $292,006.08 1,216.692 [XMR] 311
Bitcoin $46,245.37 0.796 [BTC] 54
Ethereum $1,443.41 0.327 [ETH] 5
Table with monetary gain (data refreshed 2021-11-29)

This makes total monetary gain of this malware 339,694.86 USD as of 2021-11-29. The amounts from the table above are total incomes of the Bitcoin and Ethereum wallets, so we can’t exclude the possibility that some part of money comes from other activities than mining, but we assume that even those activities would be malicious. As can be seen from the data we collected, the major focus of this campaign is on mining Monero, where attackers used ~5 times more wallet addresses and gained ~6 times more money.

Technical analysis

Dropping the payload

Let’s continue straight away where we left off in the previous part. As we learned, the clipboard stealer could swap copy+pasted wallet addresses in the victim’s clipboard, as well as swap other links and information depending on the malware’s configuration. One of these links was https://yadi[.]sk/d/cQrSKI0591KwOg.

After downloading and unpacking the archive (with a password gh2018), a new sample Launcher.exe is dropped (c1a4565052f27a8191676afc9db9bfb79881d0a5111f75f68b35c4da5be1f385). Note that this approach is very specific for the MyKings clipboard stealer and requires user’s interaction. In other, and most common, cases the user obtains a whole bundled installer from the internet, unintentionally executing the AutoIt during the installation of the expected software.

This sample is the first stage of a compiled AutoIt script, a dropper that we call CoinHelper, which provides all necessary persistence, injections, checking for security software along the way, and of course downloading additional malware onto the infected machine.

Although this sample contains almost all of the latest functionality of these AutoIt droppers, it is not the latest version and some of their features are missing. For that reason, we decided to take a newer (but very similar) version of the dropper with a SHA 83a64c598d9a10f3a19eabed41e58f0be407ecbd19bb4c560796a10ec5fccdbf instead and describe thoroughly all of the functionalities in one place.

Overview of the infection chain

Exploring the first stage

Let’s dive into the newer sample. This one is usually downloaded with a name start.exe on users’ machines and holds a Google Chrome icon. Upon a closer look, it is apparent that this is a compiled AutoIt binary.

After extracting the AutoIt script from the sample we can see additional components:

  • asacpiex.dll
  • CL_Debug_Log.txt
  • glue\ChromeSetup.exe

CL_Debug_Log.txt is a clean standalone executable of 7zip and asacpiex.dll is a damaged (modified) 7zip archive carrying the second stage of the malware. Soon, we will fix this archive and look inside as well, but first, let’s focus on the extracted AutoIt script. The last binary from the list above, placed in the glue folder, is one of the many possibilities of the bundled apps inside CoinHelper. In this case, we witness a clean setup installer of the Chrome browser. If you are interested in seeing what other applications are usually bundled with CoinHelper, see Bundled apps overview for details.

Rude welcome

The AutoIt script is actually very readable. Well, perhaps even too much, looking at the vulgarity in the beginning. Note that Region / EndRegion is SciTE text editor’s feature to mark code regions. In this case, however, the script starts with the EndRegion clausule and some well known AutoIt decompilers, such as Exe2Aut (v0.10), struggle very much with this and are unable to decompile the script, effectively displaying just the rude welcome. Note that myAut2Exe (v2.12) for example has no issues with the decompilation.

We can also see here the beginning of the malware’s configuration, first checking for the existence of a mutex QPRZ3bWvXh (function called _singleton), followed by scheduled task configuration. As shown in the code above, the SystemCheck scheduled task presents itself as a Helper.exe application from Microsoft. However, Microsoft doesn’t provide any tool with such a name. The scheduled task is used for executing the malware, persistently.

The modification of the asacpiex.dll archive was done by nulling out the first five bytes of the file which can be easily restored to reflect the usual 7zip archive header: 37 7A BC AF 27. The script is replacing even more bytes, but that is not necessary.

Before we dive into the contents extracted from the archive (a keen eye already spotted that the password is JDQJndnqwdnqw2139dn21n3b312idDQDB), let’s focus on the rest of this script. We will continue with the unpacking of asacpiex.dll in the Exploring the second stage section.

In the code above, we also see that ChromeSetup.exe is placed into the glue folder. This folder (sometimes called differently, e.g. new) contains the original application with which the malware was bundled together. In our analysis we are showing here, this is a clean installer of the Chrome browser that is also executed at this stage to preserve the expected behavior of the whole bundle.

We encountered many different applications bundled with CoinHelper. Research regarding these bundles is provided in a standalone subsection Bundled apps overview.

Mapping the victims

In addition to fixing the damaged archive, executing the second stage, and ensuring persistence, the first stage holds one additional functionality that is quite simple, but effective.

The malware uses public services, such as IP loggers, to aggregate information about victims. The IP loggers are basically URL shorteners that usually provide comprehensive telemetry statistics over the users clicking on the shortened link.

Additionally, as we will see further in this blogpost, the attacker harvests information about victims, focusing on the victim’s OS, amount of RAM installed, the CPU and video card information, as well as the security solutions present on the system. All the collected information is formatted and concatenated to a single string.

This string is then sent to a hardcoded URL address in the form of a user-agent via GET request. In our sample, the hardcoded URL looks like https://2no[.]co/1wbYc7.

Note that URLs such as these are sometimes also used in the second stage of CoinHelper as well. From our dataset, we have found 675 different URLs where the malware sends data.

Because the attackers often use public services without authentication, we can actually peek inside and figure out the figures from their perspective. The bottom line is that they are making a statistical evaluation of their various infection vectors (bundled installers from unofficial software sources, torrents, MyKings botnet, and more) across the infected user base, effectively trying to focus on people with higher-end machines as well as getting to know which regions in the world use what antivirus and/or security solutions.

As an example, we can see information available on one of the many still-active links containing a date and time of the click, IP address (anonymized) and ISP, corresponding geolocation, used web browser and of course, the user-agent string with the harvested data.

Attacker’s view on the infected victims (black squares are anonymized IP addresses)

The attacker also has access to the geographic location of the victims in a map view.

Attacker’s view on the geographic information of the infected victims

In the sections below, the reader can find further details of how the information is obtained in the first stage of the malware, along with further details about the harvested data.

Checking the CPU 

The malware executes one of the two variants of shellcodes (x86 and x64), present in hexadecimal form:

  • 0x5589E5538B45088B4D0C31DB31D20FA28B6D10894500895D04894D0889550C5B5DC3
  • 0x5389C889D131DB31D20FA26741890067418958046741894808674189500C5BC3

When we disassemble the shellcodes, we can see common cpuid checks, returning all its values (registers EAX, EBX, ECX, EDX). Thus, the malware effectively harvests all the information of the currently present processor of the victim, its model and features.

x86 CPUID check
x64 CPUID check

All the information is parsed and particular features are extracted. Actually, the feature lists in the malware are identical to the CPUID Wikipedia page, exactly pointing out where the attacker was inspired.

Even though all the information is harvested, only the AES instruction set bit is actually checked – if the processor supports this instruction set and it is x64, only then it will install the x64 bit version of the final stage (coinminer). In the other case, the x86 version is used.

As we mentioned, the rest of the information is collected, but it is actually not used anywhere in the code.

CPU and video card information

The cpuid check is not the only one that performs HW checks on the victim’s system. Two additional WMI queries are used to obtain the names of the victim’s processor and video card:
SELECT * FROM Win32_Processor
SELECT * FROM Win32_VideoController

Furthermore, the malware uses GetSystemInfo to collect the SYSTEM_INFO structure to check the number of cores the victim’s CPU has.

AV checks

The script also checks for running processes, searching for security solutions present on the machine. This information is once again “just” logged and sent to the IP logging server – no other action is done with this information (e.g. altering malware’s functionality).

The complete list of all the checked AV / Security solutions by their processes, as presented in the malware, can be found in Appendix.

Exploring the second stage – asacpiex.dll

Now, let’s dive into the second stage of the malware. After the asacpiex.dll archive is fixed, it is saved as CR_Debug_Log.txt to the Temp folder.

To unpack the archive, the malware uses a password JDQJndnqwdnqw2139dn21n3b312idDQDB. This is the most common password for these AutoIt droppers. However, it is not the only one and so far, we counted two additional passwords:

Unpacking reveals two additional files:

  • 32.exe
  • 64.exe

Depending on the architecture of the OS and whether the AES instruction set is available, one of these files is copied into
C:\Users\<username>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Helper.exe
and executed (via a scheduled task).

Both of these files are once again compiled AutoIt scripts, carrying functionality to distribute further payloads, in the form of coinminers, to victims via Tor network.

After the decompilation of the files, we can see that both of the output scripts are very similar. The only difference is that the x64 version tries to also utilize the user’s graphic card as well if possible for coinmining, not just the CPU. In the text below, we will focus on the x64 version since it contains more functionality.

Although Helper.exe is the most common name of the malware by far, it is not the only possibility. Other options we’ve seen in the wild are for example:

  • fuck.exe
  • Helperr.exe
  • svchost.exe
  • System.exe
  • system32.exe
  • WAPDWA;DJ.exe
  • WorkerB.exe

Helper.exe

As we already mentioned, the primary goal of the Helper.exe dropper is to drop an XMRig coinminer onto the victim’s system via Tor network. The coinminer is executed with a hardcoded configuration present in the script.

Helper.exe holds a variety of other functionalities as well, such as performing several system checks on the victim’s PC, injecting itself into %WINDIR%\System32\attrib.exe system binary, checking the “idleness” of the system to intensify the mining, and more. Let’s now have a look at how all these functionalities work.

Downloading coinminers via Tor network

The main purpose of the dropper is to download a payload, in our case a coinminer, onto the infected system. To do so, the malware performs several preparatory actions to set up the environment to its needs.

First and foremost, the malware contains two additional files in hexadecimal form. The first is once again a clean 7zip binary (but different than CL_Debug_Log.txt) and the second one is a 7zip archive containing a clean Tor binary and belonging libraries:

  • libcrypto-1_1-x64.dll
  • libevent-2-1-7.dll
  • libevent_core-2-1-7.dll
  • libevent_extra-2-1-7.dll
  • libgcc_s_seh-1.dll
  • libssl-1_1-x64.dll
  • libssp-0.dll
  • libwinpthread-1.dll
  • tor.exe
  • zlib1.dll

To be able to unpack Tor, a password DxSqsNKKOxqPrM4Y3xeK is required. This password is also required for unpacking every downloaded coinminer as well, but we will get to that later.

After Tor is executed, it listens on port 9303 on localhost (127.0.0.1) and waits for requests. To prevent confusion at this point, note that this execution is hidden by default because tor.exe should not be mistaken for a Tor browser. tor.exe is a process providing Tor routing (without a GUI). In a common Tor browser installation, it can be usually found in \<Tor browser root folder>\Browser\TorBrowser\Tor\tor.exe.

The script further contains a few Base64 encoded Tor addresses of the C&C servers and tries which one is alive. This is done by initializing SOCKS4 communication via a crafted request (in the hexadecimal form):
04 01 00 50 00 00 00 FF 00 $host 00
where $host is the demanded server address.

The malware expects one of the standard protocol responses and only if the response contains 0x5A byte, the malware will further proceed to communicate with the server.

Byte Meaning
0x5A Request granted
0x5B Request rejected or failed
0x5C Request failed because client is not running identd (or not reachable from server)
0x5D Request failed because client’s identd could not confirm the user ID in the request
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SOCKS

The lists of Tor addresses differ quite a bit across multiple samples. So far we’ve seen 24 unique C&C servers (see our IoC repository for the complete list). However, at the time of writing, only two of all the servers were still active:

  • 2qepteituvpy42gggxxqaaeozppjagsu5xz2zdsbugt3425t2mbjvbad[.]onion
  • jbadd74iobimuuuvsgm5xdshpzk4vxuh35egd7c3ivll3wj5lc6tjxqd[.]onion

If we access the server using e.g. Tor browser, we can see a default Windows Server landing page, illustrated in figure below. Note that this is a very common landing page for MyKings C&Cs. However, this single fact is not sufficient for attributing CoinHelper to MyKings.

Default Windows Server landing page. The same image is also commonly present on MyKings C&C servers, but that is not sufficient for attribution.

The malware is capable of downloading four files in total from an active server, present in a “public” subfolder:

  • public/upd.txt
  • public/64/64.txt (or public/32/32.txt if the “32 bit variant” of the script is used)
  • public/vc/amd.txt
  • public/vc/nvidia.txt

The files 64.txt (32.txt), amd.txt, and nvidia.txt are all XMRig coinminers (encoded and compressed), both for CPU or an according GPU card.

The upd.txt file is a plaintext file containing a version number bounded by _ and ! symbols, for example _!1!_. The malware asks the server what’s the version and if the version is newer, all coinminers are updated (downloaded again).

The miners are downloaded as a hexadecimal string from the C&C, ending with a constant string _!END!_. After the end stub is removed and the string decoded, we get a 7zip archive. Once again, we can use the DxSqsNKKOxqPrM4Y3xeK password to unpack it.

After the unpacking, we can get these files:

  • SysBackup.txt – for CPU miners (both 32 and 64 bit)
  • SysBackupA.txt – when there is also AMD GPU detected
  • SysBackupN.txt – when there is also NVIDIA GPU detected

These files are once again present in a hexadecimal form, this time starting with 0x prefix and without the end stub.

Furthermore, a few additional files can be found with the “SysBackup” files for ensuring the mining functionality and optimal mining, when appropriate (for example xmrig-cuda.dll for NVIDIA cards).

The download process can be seen in the following visualisation:

Coinmining

The coinmining (and the 7zip unpacking) is executed via process injection. The CPU coinmining is performed by injecting into a newly created and suspended process of %WINDIR%\System32\attrib.exe.

Execution of all the other components, such as GPU mining or unpacking of the coinminer payloads downloaded from Tor, is done by injecting into itself, meaning a new suspended instance of Helper.exe is used for the injection. When there is coinmining on GPU supported, both CPU and GPU are executed in parallel.

Note that the injection is done by a publicly available AutoIt injector, so the author chose the copy+paste way without reinventing the wheel.

From our research, we’ve only seen XMRig to be deployed as the final coinmining payload. The malware executes it with common parameters, with one approach worth mentioning – a parameter setting the password for the mining server “-p”. In standard situations, the password doesn’t really matter so the malware authors usually use “x” for the password. In this case, however, the malware generates a GUID of the victim and appends it to the usual “x”.

The GUID is created by concatenating values from one of the WMI queries listed below:
SELECT * FROM Win32_ComputerSystemProduct
SELECT * FROM Win32_BIOS
SELECT * FROM Win32_Processor
SELECT * FROM Win32_PhysicalMedia

Which query should be used is defined in the configuration of the AutoIt script. The GUID is created by hashing the obtained information using MD5 and formatted as a standard GUID string:
/\{[0-9A-F]{8}-[0-9A-F]{4}-[0-9A-F]{4}-[0-9A-F]{4}-[0-9A-F]{12}\}/

With this approach, the malware author is in fact able to calculate the exact number of infected users who are actually mining, because all the mining will be performed via a unique password, passing it as an ID of the “worker” (= victim) to the pool.

Persistence

Similarly to the first stage, at the beginning of the second stage, particular mutexes are checked and created if necessary:

  • QPRZ1bWvXh
  • QPRZ1bWvXh2

As we can see, only the number in the middle of the mutex is changed compared to the first stage (QPRZ3bWvXh). The second mutex has an appended 2 as a constant. We have also seen QPRZ2bWvXh used as well, once again changing the middle number.

For the sake of staying hidden for the longest time possible, the malware checks several processes using a native AutoIt ProcessExists function for any running system monitoring and analysis tools:

  • aida64.exe
  • AnVir.exe
  • anvir64.exe
  • GPU-Z.exe
  • HWiNFO32.exe
  • HWiNFO64.exe
  • i7RealTempGT.exe
  • OpenHardwareMonitor.exe
  • pchunter64.exe
  • perfmon.exe
  • ProcessHacker.exe
  • ProcessLasso.exe
  • procexp.exe
  • procexp64.exe
  • RealTemp.exe
  • RealTempGT.exe
  • speedfan.exe
  • SystemExplorer.exe
  • taskmgr.exe
  • VirusTotalUpload2.exe

When the tool is spotted, the malware temporarily disables the mining. The information about running coinminers is stored in two files:

  • mn.pid
  • gmn.pid

As their names might disclose, a particular PID of the running (GPU) coinminer is written there.

The malware also monitors whether the victim actually uses their PC at the moment. If the user is idle for a while, in our particular case for 3 minutes, the current coinmining is terminated and a new coinmining process is executed and set to leverage 100% of the CPU on all threads. This information (PID) is stored in a file called mn.ld. When the PC is actively used, the mining is set to 50% of the available performance. On the other hand, GPU mining is performed only when the user is not actively using their PC (for 2 minutes).

The malware also lists all console windows present on the system and finds out those that have visibility set to hidden. If such a window is found and it doesn’t belong to CoinHelper, the malware considers it as a competing miner and kills the process.

Data harvesting and AV checks

Similarly to the previous AutoIt stage, Helper.exe collects information about the infected system, too, as shown in the table below:

Information Purpose
Number of available CPU threads If the victim’s system is idle, the malware leverages all CPU threads
Video card type What kind of card is used – for Nvidia or AMD optimized coinmining
CPU type Not used (*see below)
Security solution Not used (*see below)
HW ID hashed by MD5 Appended to XMRig password, resulting in a parameter -p xMD5 (see Coinmining for details)

As we could see (*) in the table above, the code actually contains functions for the harvesting of some information that is not actually executed. This means that while it could gather this information, it doesn’t. Due to similarities with the first stage, we suppose that the authors have forgotten some artifacts of previous versions due to shifts of functionality between the first AutoIt stage and the Helper.exe stage.

The malware recognizes which graphic card is available on the infected system. These cards are detected using the WMI query on Win32_VideoController. You can find all the cards, as presented in the malware, in the table below:

AMD Series AMD Model
RX 460, 470, 480, 540, 550, 560, 570, 580, 590, 640, 5500, 5600, 5700, 6800, 6900
R5 230
R7 240
W4300
VEGA 56, 64
Radeon 520, 530, 535, 540, 550, 610, 620, 625, 630, VII
WX 3100, 5100
Nvidia Series Nvidia Model
P104-100
P106-090
GTX 750, 970, 980, 980, 1050, 1060, 1070, 1080, 1650, 1660, TITAN
RTX 2050, 2060, 2070, 2080, 3060, 3070, 3080, 3090
GT 710, 720, 730, 740, 1030
Quadro K1000, K1200, P400, P620, P1000, P2000, P2200, P5000

If any card from above is detected and also the video adapter name matches either “Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.” or “NVIDIA”, the malware uses XMRig to leverage GPU for coinmining.

From the list of graphic cards, it is apparent that the malware doesn’t hesitate to leverage the newest models of graphic cards.

Bundled apps overview

After looking at the software that the infected victims originally wanted to install, we can conclude that CoinHelper can be bundled with practically anything. So far, we’ve seen over 2,700 different apps bundled with CoinHelper (differentiating by unique SHA256 hashes). The majority of the software consists of clean installers, cracked software, cracked games or game cheats like ChromeSetup, Photoshop, MinecraftSetup, Assassin’s Creed Valhalla, CyberPunk 2077 Trainer or AmongUs cheats. With repertoire like this, the authors of CoinHelper are able to reach out to almost any type of audience ensuring successful spread of the malware.

Persuading someone to download supposedly clean software, which is in reality bundled with malware, is easier than persuading someone to willingly download malware which is secretly bundled with another malware. Authors of CoinHelper are not afraid of this challenge as we observed CoinHelper to be also bundled with samples of malware like 888 RAT or njRAT. We assume that with this approach, the target group of people gets extended by “script kiddies” and inexperienced people with an interest in malware. As this group of people is very specific, there are only a few samples of malware in comparison with the amount of other software. Graphical overview of this proportion can be seen also in the image below.

Origin of the bundled apps

Apart from the Yandex Disk storage from where we started our investigation, we can confirm that another considerable method of spreading CoinHelper is via malicious torrents placed on internet forums focused on cracked software.

Forums overview

The authors of the malware successfully made it easy for people to stumble upon the malicious torrents. During our research, we found CoinHelper bundled with software on  Russian internet forums focusing on cracked software:

  • windows-program[.]com
  • softmania[.]net

Even though we were able to find information about the number of downloads of the malware from these forums (more about this later), it wasn’t nearly enough to explain the number of hits from our user base. Because of this, we have to assume that there are tens of forums like the ones mentioned above, spreading malware through cracked software. 

More about the forums

Let’s focus on the first forum windows-program[.]com, as the other one is very similar. Between the thousands and thousands of articles, we found the samples we were looking for. As it turns out, registered user Alex4 created 29 different articles mostly containing torrents for cracked software including:

Advertised software Description & functionality
Ableton Live Suite 9.7.3 + Crack + торрент Audio workstation and music production software with current price 599 €
Dr.Web Security Space 11.0.0.11162 x86 x64 + ключ + торрент Anti-virus solution
ESET NOD32 Smart Security 10.1.219.1 + ключи + торрент Anti-virus solution
Avast Premier 11.2.2260 + ключ + торрент Anti-virus solution
Adobe Photoshop CC 2017.1.1 + Portable + торрент Photo and image editing software
Fraps 3.5.99 на русском + crack + торрент Screen capture and screen recording utility, popular to videocapture games

As can be seen in the table above, CoinHelper can be also found bundled with multiple well-known AV solutions. Let’s take a closer look at a post about Avast AV for the sake of awareness about threats that come with downloading AV from sources like this.

First thing to notice is that the post is from 2020-11-06. It also  contains some  screenshots of the promised program, but it can be seen that it is a very old version of our AV from 2016. After launching the installation, users get to choose between installing the old version or updating AV to the newest version. Unfortunately, the installer was manipulated and neither of the options work and the no-update variant crashes the system. As a result, the output from this download for users is that they don’t get AV protection, they might crash their system and they also get infected with CoinHelper. Because of this we highly recommend downloading only signed software from verified and trustworthy sources and if possible verify hashes or checksums of installers.

As a matter of fact, neither of the AV installers worked. After launching an installer, CoinHelper would install itself and installation would fail because of various reasons. It makes sense that authors of the malware would choose malfunctioning these installers, because there is no reason to give victims a tool that kills and removes their freshly dropped malware from the system.

In the post, it is possible to download three different things:

  • A torrent file with which it is possible to download the advertised program with CoinHelper
  • A zip archive protected with a password “123” containing the advertised program with CoinHelper

After choosing between a zip archive or torrent, the page opens a new tab with information about the file to be downloaded. On the image below it is possible to see the date when the file was added to the page. Surprisingly it is 2021-07-12 and not 2020-11-06, so the file is much newer than the post referencing it. Because we have seen multiple versions of the malicious AutoIt scripts, we suppose that authors of the malware are updating these files with new versions of CoinHelper. 

Additional information that can be noticed on the image above is that the torrent file was downloaded 549 times and after adding the 508 downloads of the zip archive, we can conclude that more than 1,000 people may have got infected just from this one post on this forum. After checking all the forum posts and files uploaded by the user Alex4 we can confirm that the total number of downloads is more than 45,000 by the 2021-11-02. We consider this number to be quite alarming considering it is the spread of malware only from a single internet forum.

The second forum (softmania[.]net) is quite similar. In this case, the user from whose account the malware is spreading is WebGid4. This user has 56 publications on the forum among which you can find posts about following software:

Advertised software Description & functionality
Windows 11 64bit Pro-Home v.21 торрент Windows 11 ISO image
Adobe Photoshop Lightroom Classic 2021 v10.0 + торрен Photo and image editing software
Microsoft Office 2016 Professional Plus 16.0.7571.2075 + Ключ + Torrent MS Office package
VMware Workstation 12 Pro 12.5.4 Software that creates and runs virtual machines
Steinberg Cubase Pro 10.0.50 2020 + торрент Software for composing, recording, mixing and editing music

The first thing that caught our eyes was the ISO image of the brand new OS Windows 11. The official Windows 11 release date was 2021-10-05, which was only a few weeks before the release of this blogpost. This means that the attackers are really keeping the pace with the current trends and they try very hard to have interesting software to infect as many victims as they can.

After downloading the torrent named “Windows 11 64bit Pro-Home v.21 торрент” victims would download through the torrent client an ISO file named “windows_11_CLIENT_CONSUMER_x64FRE_en-us.iso”. This is a working ISO image of Windows 11, which installs a brand new operating system, but as a bonus it deploys CoinHelper that is inside the ISO image. After unpacking the ISO file, there is an executable called \sources\setup.exe present that contains bundled CoinHelper.

If the victims were more careful, a hint that something is sketchy could be seen after clicking on the download torrent link and opening a download page in the new tab. The torrent was added 2021-07-10, only 17 days after the official announcement of Windows 11 and ~3 months before the official release. This already raised many flags, and as we later found out, it is a Windows 11 developer version that was leaked in June 2021. This ISO image is able to successfully upgrade existing Windows OS to the new Windows 11 also with CoinHelper in it.

Seeding source

We’ve seen these malicious files being downloaded through torrents which are seeded from seed boxes. A seed box is a remote server used for storing and seeding files through the P2P network that can be rented as a service. Seed boxes serve as a layer of anonymity for attackers because instead of exposing their IP address, only the IP address of the seed box can be seen. They also ensure high availability of the content, because the seed box is supposed to be running 24/7 (unlike regular PCs). Furthermore, companies renting seed boxes also offer different bandwidths to be able to support even higher download rates.

When we looked into the malicious torrents from the Alex4 on windows-program[.]com forum, we saw that the malicious content is downloaded from the server with IP 88.204.193[.]34 on port 56000 (apart from others probably already infected seeders). After taking a closer look at this IP address, we’ve found out that the IP address is located in Kazakhstan and it is connected to the service named megaseed (megaseed.kz).

Conclusion

In this blog post, we presented a detailed technical analysis of CoinHelper, a family of AutoIt droppers, which provides a massive coinmining campaign affecting hundreds of thousands of users worldwide. The malware is being spread in a form of a bundle with another software, being it game cheats, cracked software, or even clean installers such as Google Chrome or AV products, as well as hiding in Windows 11 ISO image, and many others.

Furthermore, we explained how the malware maps the victims of the campaign using public IP logging services to better understand the effectiveness of the chosen infection vectors in certain regions. Using these services, the malware also harvests information about victims’ security solutions and available computational power.

We explained how the malware can hide literally in any software from unofficial sources. The scope of the spreading is also supported by seeding the bundled apps via torrents, further abusing the unofficial way of downloading software.

Indicators of Compromise (IoC)

SHA256 File name
83a64c598d9a10f3a19eabed41e58f0be407ecbd19bb4c560796a10ec5fccdbf start.exe
cc36bb34332e2bc505da46ca2f17206a8ae3e4f667d9bdfbc500a09e77bab09c asacpiex.dll
ea308c76a2f927b160a143d94072b0dce232e04b751f0c6432a94e05164e716d CL_Debug_Log.txt
126d8e9e03d7b656290f5f1db42ee776113061dbd308db79c302bc79a5f439d3 32.exe
7a3ad620b117b53faa19f395b9532d3db239a1d6b46432033cc0ef6a8d2377cd 64.exe
7387e57e5ecfdba01f0ad25eeb49abf52fa0b1c66db0b67e382d3b9c057f51a8 32.txt
ff5aa6390ed05c887cd2db588a54e6da94351eca6f43a181f1db1f9872242868 64.txt
6753d1a408e085e4b6243bfd5e8b44685e8930a81ec27795ccd61f8d54643c4e amd.txt
93dd8ef915ca39f2a016581d36c0361958d004760a32e9ee62ff5440d1eee494 nvidia.txt
Mutex
QPRZ1bWvXh
QPRZ1bWvXh2
QPRZ2bWvXh
QPRZ3bWvXh
Logging services
https://2no[.]co/1wbYc7

Appendix

List of checked security solutions

AV / Security solution Checked processes
Avast AvastUI.exe, AvastSvc.exe
NOD egui.exe, ekrn.exe
Kaspersky avp.exe, avpui.exe
AVG avguix.exe, AVGUI.exe
Dr.web dwengine.exe
Ad-Aware AdAwareTray.exe, AdAwareDesktop.exe
SecureAPlus SecureAPlus.exe, SecureAPlusUI.exe
Arcabit arcabit.exe, arcamenu.exe
Bitdefender seccenter.exe, bdagent.exe, bdwtxag.exe, agentcontroller.exe
CAT-QuickHeal ONLINENT.exe, SCANNER.exe
Comodo cis.exe, vkise.exe
Cybereason CybereasonRansomFree.exe
Emsisoft a2guard.exe, a2start.exe
eScan escanmon.exe, TRAYICOS.exe, escanpro.exe
F-Prot FProtTray.exe, FPWin.exe
GData AVKTray.exe, GDKBFltExe32.exe, GDSC.exe
ikarus guardxkickoff.exe, virusutilities.exe
K7AntiVirus K7TSecurity.exe, K7TSMain.exe, K7TAlert.exe
MaxSecure Gadget.exe, MaxProcSCN.exe, MaxSDTray.exe, MaxSDUI.exe, MaxUSBProc.exe
McAfee McDiReg.exe, McPvTray.exe, McUICnt.exe, mcuicnt.exe, MpfAlert.exe, ModuleCoreService.exe, uihost.exe, delegate.exe
MicrosoftSecurityEssentials msseces.exe
Panda PSUAConsole.exe, PSUAMain.exe
TrendMicro PtSessionAgent.exe, uiSeAgnt.exe, uiWinMgr.exe
TrendMicro-HouseCall HousecallLauncher.exe, housecall.bin, HouseCallX.exe
VIPRE SBAMTray.exe, VIPREUI.exe
Webroot WRSA.exe
ZoneAlarm zatray.exe
AhnLab-V3 ASDCli.exe, ASDUp.exe, MUdate.exe, V3UPUI.exe, V3UI.exe
Avira avgnt.exe, Avira.Systray.exe, ngen.exe, Avira.VPN.Notifier.exe, msiexec.exe
Bkav BkavHome.exe
BkavPro Bka.exe, BkavSystemServer.exe, BLuPro.exe
F-Secure fshoster32.exe
Jiangmin KVMonXP.kxp, KVPreScan.exe, KVXp.kxp
Kingsoft kislive.exe, kxetray.exe
NANO-Antivirus nanoav.exe
Qihoo-360 efutil.exe, DesktopPlus.exe, PopWndLog.exe, PromoUtil.exe, QHSafeMain.exe, QHSafeTray.exe, SoftMgrLite.exe
Rising popwndexe.exe, rsmain.exe, RsTray.exe
SUPERAntiSpyware SUPERAntiSpyware.exe
Tencent QQPCTray.exe, QQPCUpdateAVLib.exe, Tencentdl.exe, TpkUpdate.exe
VBA32 vba32ldrgui.exe, VbaScheluder.exe, BavPro_Setup_Mini_C1.exe
ViRobot hVrSetup.exe, hVrTray.exe, hVrScan.exe, hVrContain.exe
Zillya ZTS.exe
Defender MSASCui.exe, MSASCuiL.exe
SmartScreen smartscreen.exe

The post Toss a Coin to your Helper (Part 2 of 2) appeared first on Avast Threat Labs.

Before yesterdayReverse Engineering

The King is Dead, Long Live MyKings! (Part 1 of 2)

12 October 2021 at 11:35

MyKings is a long-standing and relentless botnet which has been active from at least 2016. Since then it has spread and extended its infrastructure so much that it has even gained multiple names from multiple analysts around the world — MyKings, Smominru, and DarkCloud, for example. Its vast infrastructure consists of multiple parts and modules, including bootkit, coin miners, droppers, clipboard stealers, and more.

Our research has shown that, since 2019, the operators behind MyKings have amassed at least $24 million USD (and likely more) in the Bitcoin, Ethereum, and Dogecoin cryptowallets associated with MyKings. While we can’t attribute that amount solely to MyKings, it still represents a significant sum that can be tied to MyKings activity.

Our hunting for new samples brought us over 6,700 unique samples. Just since the beginning of 2020 (after the release of the Sophos whitepaper), we protected over 144,000 Avast users threatened by this clipboard stealer module. Most attacks happened in Russia, India, and Pakistan.

Map illustrating targeted countries since 1.1.2020 until 5.10.2021

In this first part of our two-part blog series, we will peek into the already known clipboard stealer module of MyKings, focusing on its technical aspects, monetization, and spread. In addition, we’ll look into how the functionality of  the clipboard stealer enabled attackers to carry out frauds with Steam trade offers and Yandex Disk links, leading to more financial gain and infection spread. 

Avast has been tracking the MyKings’ clipboard stealer since the beginning of 2018, but we can’t rule out an even earlier creation date. Basic functionality of this module was already covered by Gabor Szappanos from SophosLabs, but we are able to contribute with new technical details and IoCs.

1. Monetary gain

When Sophos released their blog at the end of 2019, they stated that the coin addresses are “not used or never received more than a few dollars”. After tracing newer samples, we were able to extract new wallet addresses and extend the list of 49 coin addresses in Sophos IoCs to over 1300.

Because of the amount of new data, we decided to share our script, which can query the amount of cryptocurrency transferred through a crypto account. Because not all blockchains have this possibility, we decided to find out how much money attackers gained through Bitcoin, Ethereum, and Dogecoin accounts. After inspecting these addresses we have confirmed that more than $24,700,000 worth in cryptocurrencies was transferred through these addresses. We can safely assume that this number is in reality higher, because the amount consists of money gained in only three cryptocurrencies from more than 20 in total used in malware. It is also important to note here that not all of the money present in the cryptowallets necessarily comes from the MyKings campaign alone.

After taking a closer look at the transactions and inspecting the contents of installers that dropped the clipboard stealer, we believe that part of this money was gained through crypto miners. The clipboard stealer module and the crypto miners were seen using the same wallet addresses.

Cryptocurrency Earnings in USD Earnings in cryptocurrency
Bitcoin 6,626,146.252 [$] 132.212 [BTC]
Ethereum 7,429,429.508 [$] 2,158.402 [ETH]
Dogecoin 10,652,144.070 [$] 44,618,283.601 [DOGE]
Table with monetary gain (data refreshed 5.10.2021)
Histogram of monetary gains for Bitcoin, Ethereum and Dogecoin wallets

2. Attribution

Even though the clipboard stealer and all related files are attributed in previous blog posts to MyKings, we wanted to confirm those claims, because of lack of definitive proof. Some articles (e.g. by Sophos) are saying that some scripts in the attribution chain, like c3.bat may kill other botnets or earlier versions of itself, which raises doubts. Other articles (e.g by Guardicore) are even working with the theory of a rival copycat botnet deleting MyKings.  MyKings is a large botnet with many modules and before attributing all the monetary gains to this clipboard stealer, we wanted to be able to prove that the clipboard stealer is really a part of MyKings.

We started our attribution with the sample d2e8b77fe0ddb96c4d52a34f9498dc7dd885c7b11b8745b78f3f6beaeec8e191. This sample is a NSIS installer which drops NsCpuCNMiner in both 32 and 64 bit versions.

In the NSIS header was possible to see this Monero address used for miner configuration:
41xDYg86Zug9dwbJ3ysuyWMF7R6Un2Ko84TNfiCW7xghhbKZV6jh8Q7hJoncnLayLVDwpzbPQPi62bvPqe6jJouHAsGNkg2

NSIS header

Apart from the NsCpuCNMiner, the sample dropped an additional file with a name java12.exe into C:\Users\<username>\AppData\Local\Temp\java.exe. This file has SHA256 0390b466a8af2405dc269fd58fe2e3f34c3219464dcf3d06c64d01e07821cd7a and according to our data, was downloaded from http://zcop[.]ru/java12.dat by the installer. This file could be also downloaded from http://kriso[.]ru/java12.dat (both addresses contained multiple samples with different configurations at different times). This file contains a clipboard stealer. Also, the same Monero address can be found in both the clipboard stealer and the NSIS configuration.

After researching the Monero address, we found in blogpost written by Tencent Yujian Threat Intelligence Center, that sample b9c7cb2ebf3c5ffba6fdeea0379ced4af04a7c9a0760f76c5f075ded295c5ce2 uses the same address. This sample is another NSIS installer which drops the NsCpuCNMiner and the clipboard stealer. This NSIS installer was usually dropped under the name king.exe or king.dat and could be downloaded from http://kr1s[.]ru/king.dat.

In the next step, we looked into the address http://kr1s[.]ru/king.dat and we found that at different times, this address contained the file f778ca041cd10a67c9110fb20c5b85749d01af82533cc0429a7eb9badc45345c usually dropped into C:\Users\<username>\AppData\Local\Temp\king.exe or C:\Windows\system32\a.exe. This file is again a NSIS installer that downloads clipboard stealer, but this time it contains URLs http://js[.]mys2016.info:280/helloworld.msi and http://js[.]mys2016.info:280/v.sct.

URL http://js[.]mys2016.info:280/v.sct is interesting, because this URL is also contacted by the sample named my1.html or  my1.bat or my1.bat with SHA256 5ae5ff335c88a96527426b9d00767052a3cba3c3493a1fa37286d4719851c45c.

This file is a batch script which is almost identical to the script with the same name my1.bat and SHA256 2aaf1abeaeeed79e53cb438c3bf6795c7c79e256e1f35e2a903c6e92cee05010, as shown further below.

Both scripts contain the same strings as C:\Progra~1\shengda, C:\Progra~1\kugou2010

There are only two important differences to notice:

  1. At line 12, one script uses address http://js[.]mys2016.info:280/v.sct and the other uses address http://js[.]1226bye.xyz:280/v.sct.
  2. Line 25 in the second script has commands that the first script doesn’t have. You can notice strings like fuckyoumm3, a very well known indicator of MyKings.
Comparison of the batch scripts – script   5ae5ff335c88a96527426b9d00767052a3cba3c3493a1fa37286d4719851c45c contacting the C&C related to the clipboard stealer
Comparison of the batch scripts – script 2aaf1abeaeeed79e53cb438c3bf6795c7c79e256e1f35e2a903c6e92cee05010 contacting the C&C related to MyKings

Furthermore, it is possible to look at the file c3.bat with SHA256 0cdef01e74acd5bbfb496f4fad5357266dabb2c457bc3dc267ffad6457847ad4. This file is another batch script which communicates with the address http://js[.]1226bye.xyz:280/v.sct and contains many MyKings specific strings like fuckayoumm3 or task name Mysa1.

Attribution chain

3. Technical analysis

Our technical analysis of the clipboard stealer focuses primarily on new findings.

3.1 Goal of the malware

The main purpose of the clipboard stealer is rather simple: checking the clipboard for specific content and manipulating it in case it matches predefined regular expressions. This malware counts on the fact that users do not expect to paste values different from the one that they copied. It is easy to notice when someone forgets to copy and paste something completely different (e.g. a text instead of an account number), but it takes special attention to notice the change of a long string of random numbers and letters to a very similar looking string, such as cryptowallet addresses. This process of swapping is done using  functions OpenClipboard, EmptyClipboard, SetClipboardData and CloseClipboard. Even though this functionality is quite simple, it is concerning that attackers could have gained over $24,700,000 using such a simple method.

Simple routine of the clipboard content swap

As can be seen on image below, most of the regular expressions used for checking the clipboard content will match wallet formats of one specific cryptocurrency, but there are also regular expressions to match Yandex file storage, links to the Russian social network VKontakte, or Steam trade offer links.

List of regular expressions matching specific cryptocurrencies and URLs

We were able to find many comments from people at BlockChain Explorer services believing that they sent money to the incriminated accounts by a mistake and asking or demanding that their money be sent back. In response to this malicious activity, we want to increase awareness about frauds like this and we highly recommend people always double-check transaction details before sending  money.

Comments from infected users connected to address 0x039fD537A61E4a7f28e43740fe29AC84443366F6

3.2 Defense & features

Some other blog posts describe a few anti-debugging checks and defense against system monitoring tools, but we can’t confirm any new development.

In order to avoid multiple executions, the clipboard stealer checks for mutex on execution. The mutex name is created dynamically by checking on which version of OS it is launched on. This procedure is performed using functions RegOpenKeyExA which opens the registry key SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion. Afterwards, a function RegQueryValueExA is called which gets the value of ProductName. The value obtained is then concatenated with the constant suffix 02. Using this method, you can get many more possibilities of existing mutexes. In the list below, you can find a few examples of mutex names:

  • Windows 7 Professional02
  • Windows 7 Ultimate02
  • Windows 10 Enterprise02
  • Windows 10 Pro02
  • Windows XP02

In a different version of the malware, an alternative value is used from registry key SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion  and value of BuildGUID. This value is then also appended with suffix 02 to create the final mutex name.

Another mechanism serving as a defense of this malware is trying to hide the addresses of cryptowallets belonging to attackers. When the malware matches any of the regular expressions in the clipboard, it substitutes the clipboard content with a value that is hardcoded inside the malware sample. For protection against quick analysis and against static extraction with regular expressions, the substitute values are encrypted. Encryption used is a very simple ROT cipher, where the key is set to -1.

For a quick and static extraction of wallets from samples, it’s possible to decrypt the whole sample (which destroys all data except wanted values) and then use regular expressions to extract the hidden substitute values. The advantage of this approach is that the malware authors already provided us with all necessary regular expressions; thus the extraction process of the static information can be easily automated.

3.3 Newly uncovered functionality

With a larger dataset of samples, we were also able to reveal the intentions of regular expressions checking for URLs.

3.3.1 Steam trade frauds

One of the regular expressions hardcoded in samples looks like this:
((https://steamcommunit))(?!.*id|.*id)(([a-zA-Z0-9.-]+.[a-zA-Z]{2,4})|([0-9]{1,3}.[0-9]{1,3}.[0-9]{1,3}.[0-9]{1,3}))(/[a-zA-Z0-9%:/-_?.',27h,'~&]*)?

This kind of expression is supposed to match Steam trade offer links. Users on the Steam platform can create trade offers to trade what are usually in-game items from their inventory with other users. The value of the items that can be traded starts at only a few cents, but the most expensive items are being sold for hundreds or thousands dollars.

The clipboard stealer manipulates the trade offer URL and changes the receiving side, so Steam users send their items to someone completely unknown. The exchanged link then looks like this one:
https://steamcommunity[.]com/tradeoffer/new/?partner=121845838&token=advSgAXy

In total we were able to extract 14 different Steam trade offer links that appeared in almost 200 samples. These links lead us to 14 Steam accounts — some of which were banned and some had set privacy restrictions — but among the working public accounts we were able to find information that assured us that these frauds happened. An example is this is an account which was bound to the trade offer link listed above:
https://steamcommunity.com/id/rosher

After checking the comments section of this account, we could see multiple people getting angry and curious as to why their trade offer links are getting changed. Even though some people noticed the change in the trade offer link, we suppose that some trades were completed. We were not able to estimate how much money could have been stolen through this technique.

Comments  from https://steamcommunity.com/id/rosher

Translation of comments:

  1. 9 Oct, 2020 @ 7:47 pm why is my trade link changing to yours?
  2. 21 Jul, 2020 @ 2:16 pm Th for the garbage with a trade link !!! ???
  3. 27 Jun, 2020 @ 5:05 am what a fagot what did you do with the link

3.3.2 Fake Yandex Disk links 

Another functionality is related to the regular expression:
((https://yad))+(([a-zA-Z0-9.-]+.[a-zA-Z]{2,4})|([0-9]{1,3}.[0-9]

This regular expression matches links to Yandex Disk storage. Yandex Disk is a cloud service created by multinational Russian company Yandex and can be used similarly as Google Drive or Dropbox for sharing files.

The objective of this technique is to match links that users are sending to their friends and family to share files or photos. If the malware runs on the sender’s machine, the infected victim is sending wrong links to all their acquaintances. If the malware runs on the machine of the user that receives the link and copy/pastes it to the browser address bar, the victim again opens a wrong link. In both cases, the wrong link gets opened by someone unaware that the content is wrong. In both cases, the victim downloads files from that link and opens them, because there is no reason to not trust the files received from someone they know.

From the set of analyzed samples, we extracted following 4 links to Yandex Disk storage:

  1. https://yadi[.]sk/d/cQrSKI0591KwOg
  2. https://yadi[.]sk/d/NGyR4jFCNjycVA
  3. https://yadi[.]sk/d/zCbAMw973ZQ5t3
  4. https://yadi[.]sk/d/ZY1Qw7RRCfLMoQ

All of the links contain packed archives in a .rar or .zip format, protected with a password. The password is usually written in the name of the file. As you can see on the image below, the file is named, for example, as “photos,” with the password 5555.

Contents on https://disk[.]yandex.ru/d/NGyR4jFCNjycVA

4. Conclusion

In this first part of the blog series, we focused on the MyKings clipboard stealer module, going through the attribution chain and uncovering the amounts of money that attackers were able to obtain along the way. The clipboard stealer also focuses on frauds regarding Steam trade offers and Yandex Disk file sharing, distributing further malware to unaware victims.

In the next part of this blog series, we will go down the rabbit hole — exploring the contents of one of the downloaded payloads and providing you with an analysis of the malware inside. Don’t miss it!

Indicators of Compromise (IoC)

SHA256 hashes
0390b466a8af2405dc269fd58fe2e3f34c3219464dcf3d06c64d01e07821cd7a
0cdef01e74acd5bbfb496f4fad5357266dabb2c457bc3dc267ffad6457847ad4
2aaf1abeaeeed79e53cb438c3bf6795c7c79e256e1f35e2a903c6e92cee05010
5ae5ff335c88a96527426b9d00767052a3cba3c3493a1fa37286d4719851c45c
b9c7cb2ebf3c5ffba6fdeea0379ced4af04a7c9a0760f76c5f075ded295c5ce2
d2e8b77fe0ddb96c4d52a34f9498dc7dd885c7b11b8745b78f3f6beaeec8e191
f778ca041cd10a67c9110fb20c5b85749d01af82533cc0429a7eb9badc45345c

Also in our GitHub.

Mutexes
Windows 7 Professional02
Windows 7 Ultimate02
Windows 10 Enterprise02
Windows 10 Pro02
Windows XP02

Also in our GitHub.

C&C and logging servers
http://2no[.]co/1ajz97
http://2no[.]co/1aMC97
http://2no[.]co/1Lan77
http://ioad[.]pw/ioad.exe
http://ioad[.]pw/v.sct
http://iplogger[.]co/1h9PN6.html
http://iplogger[.]org/1aMC97
http://kr1s[.]ru/doc.dat
http://kr1s[.]ru/java.dat
http://kr1s[.]ru/tess.html
http://u.f321y[.]com/buff2.dat
http://u.f321y[.]com/dhelper.dat
http://u.f321y[.]com/oneplus.dat
http://u.f321y[.]com/tess.html
http://u.f321y[.]com/VID.dat
http://zcop[]].ru/java12.dat

Complete list in our GitHub.

Appendix

Yandex disk links
https://disk[.]yandex.ru/d/NGyR4jFCNjycVA

Complete list in our GitHub.

Steam trade offer links
https://steamcommunity[.]com/tradeoffer/new/?partner=121845838&token=advSgAXy

Complete list in our GitHub.

Wallet addresses
0x039fd537a61e4a7f28e43740fe29ac84443366f6
0x6a1A2C1081310a237Cd328B5d7e702CB80Bd2078
12cZKjNqqxcFovghD5N7fgPNMLFZeLZc3u
16G1hnVBhfrncLe71SH3mr19LBcRrkyewF
22UapTiJgyuiWg2FCGrSsEEEpV7NLsHaHBFyCZD8nc1c9DEPa5JrELQFr6MNqj3PGR4PGXzCGYQw7UemxRoRxCC97r43pZs
3PAFMSCjWpf5WDxkkECMmwqkZGHySgpuzEo
41xDYg86Zug9dwbJ3ysuyWMF7R6Un2Ko84TNfiCW7xghhbKZV6jh8Q7hJoncnLayLVDwpzbPQPi62bvPqe6jJouHAsGNkg2
7117094708328086084L
AKY1itrWtsmziQhg2THDcR3oJhXsVLRxM7
AXnqKf2Pz6n9pjYfm2hrekzUNRooggjGpr
D6nziu2uAoiWvdjRYRPH7kedgzh56Xkjjv
DAsKfjhtVYnJQ7GTjwPAJMRzCtQ1G36Cyk
DdzFFzCqrht9wkicvUx4Hc4W9gjCbx1sjsWAie5zLHo2K2R42y2zvA7W9S9dM9bCHE7xtpNriy1EpE5xwv7mPuSjhP4FyB9Z1ra6Ge3y
EVRzjX4wpeb9Ys6i1LFcZyTkEQvV9Eo2Wk
GBJOA4BNCXBSYG3ZVU2GXNOOA2JJLCG4JIVNEINHQIZNVMX4SSH5LLK7
LbAKQZutpqA9Lef6UGJ2rRMJkiq7fx7h9z
LUfdGb4pCzTAq9wucRpZZgCF69QHpAgvfE
QNkbMtCmWSCFS1U63PcAxhKufLvEwSsJ8t
qrfdnklvpgmh94dycdsp68qd6nf9fk8vlsr24n2mcp
QrKfx3qsqaMQUVHx8yAd1aTHHRdjP6Tg
qz45uawuzuf0fa3ldalh32z86nkk850e0qcpnf6yye
rNoeET6PH5dkf1VVvuUc2eZYap9yDZiKTm
SPLfNnmUdqmYu1FH2qMcGiU7P8Mwf9Z3Kr
t1JjREG9k58srT42KitRp3GyMBm2x4B889o
t1Suv1nezoZVk98LHu4tRxQ6xgofxQwi54h
VhGTEsM6ewqNBJwDEB2o6bHvRqFdGqu5HM
XdxsHPrsJvsDze4CQkMVVgsuqrHqys791e
Xup4gBGLZLDi9J9VbcLuRHGKDXaUjwMoZV

Complete list in our GitHub.

Scripts

Script for querying amounts transferred through wallet addresses can be found in our GitHub.

The post The King is Dead, Long Live MyKings! (Part 1 of 2) appeared first on Avast Threat Labs.

  • There are no more articles
❌